We a good story
Quick delivery in the UK

Books by Andrew Rawson

Filter
Filter
Genre
  • (1)
  • (39)
Type
  • (26)
  • (13)
Format
  • (25)
  • (10)
  • (8)
  • (6)
Language
  • (39)
Price
GBP
Series
  • (1)
Sort bySort Popular
  • - A Century of Civil War, Invasion, Communism and Genocide
    by Andrew Rawson
    £16.49

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £8.99 - 9.49

    Operation Detachment, the US invasion of Iwo Jima on 19 February 1945, was the first campaign on Japanese soil and resulted in some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific. Diary extracts and quotes give you a soldier's eye-view of the battle.Orders of Battle reveal the composition of the opposing forces' armies.

  • - Before, During and After the Second World War
    by Andrew Rawson
    £16.49

    Poland was re-created as an independent nation at the end of the First World War, but it soon faced problems as Nazi Germany set about expanding its control on Europe. The Wehrmacht's attack on 1 September 1939 was followed by a Red Army invasion two weeks later.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £9.49

    In spring 1945 one final hurdle faced the American and British Armies under Ike's supreme command - the Rhine. The river was the last ditch for the defence of Hitler's Germany. Crossing it would be a major military undertaking. The race was on to find intact crossings that could save many lives and precious time.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £19.99

    An in depth account of Third Army s attack against the Hindenburg Line in November 1917.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £19.99

    An in-depth account of the Battle of Messines Ridge in June 1917.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £12.99

    A fully illustrated study of the notorious Nuremberg rallies and the part they played in the Nazis' quest to establish the 1000 Year Third Reich.

  • - The War Conferences 1941-45
    by Andrew Rawson
    £16.49

    President Franklin Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill decided the strategies for the Mediterranean and the Far East at the Arcadia conference in December 1941, reconvening in Casablanca for the symbol conference in 1943. They then considered the European campaign at the Trident Conference in May and the Quadrant conference in August.

  • - The Power-crazed Medieval Kings, Popes and Emperors of Europe
    by Andrew Rawson
    £9.49

    Medieval Europe is a dark and dangerous place. It is a place where love clashes with ambition and violence rules - enemies are blinded, rivals are murdered and heretics are burnt at the stake. As the Black Death sweeps the continent and the Mongol hordes threaten its borders, can the kings of the old world survive the dawn of a new era?

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £10.49

  • - Belgium-Holland
    by Andrew Rawson
    £11.49

    Describes the fierce campaign, codenamed INFATUATE, mounted in November 1944 to clear the way through to the port of Antwerp. The book describes the extraordinary courage of the Germans who fought to the bitter end.

  • - The 1914 Campaign
    by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    The book concentrates on the British Expeditionary Force's defensive actions during the retreat from Mons through to the advance to the River Aisne and the first days of trench warfare. Then moved north to Ypres, where it endured three long weeks of German attacks. By compiling information from the Official History and the printed histories we get an in-depth British account of each large battle and minor action.Together the narrative and over 60 maps provide an insight into the British Army's experience during those early days of the First World War. This is about the men who made a difference, the men who fought off many times their number, those who led the counterattacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the real 1914 campaign fought by the British Army and learn how the brave soldiers of the BEF fought hard to achieve their objectives.

  • - September to November 1918
    by Andrew Rawson
    £6.49

    This is the story the British Expeditionary Force’s part in the final days of the Advance to Victory. It starts with the massive offensive against the Hindenburg Line at the end of September 1918. Second Army launched the first of the British attacks in Flanders on the 28th, followed by Fourth Army the next day along the St Quentin Canal.Both First and Third Armies joined in, breaking the Hindenburg Line across the Lys plain and the Artois region, taking Cambrai by 10 October. The narrative then follows the advance through the battles of the River Selle and the River Sambre. It culminates with the final operations, including the actions at Maubeuge and Mons, just before the Armistice on 11 November 1918. Time and again the British and Empire troops used well-rehearsed combined arms tactics to break down German resistance as the four year conflict came to an end.Each stage of the six week long battle is dealt with equally, focusing on the most talked about side of the campaign, the BEF’s side. Over fifty new maps chart the day by day progress of the five armies. Together the narrative and the maps explain the British Army’s experience during the days of World War One. The men who led the advances, broke down the defences and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross are mentioned. Discover the end of the Advance to Victory and learn how the British Army reached the peak of their learning curve.

  • - July to September 1918
    by Andrew Rawson
    £6.49

    This is the story of the British Expeditionary Force’s part in the opening days of the Advance to Victory. It starts with the contribution to the Battle of Fère-en-Tardenois in July; the counter-offensive which pushed the Germans back to the River Marne.Fourth Army’s attack on 8 August was called the Black Day of the German Army, but it was only the beginning of 100 days of campaigning. The narrative follows the advance as it expands across the Somme, the Artois and the Flanders regions. Time and again the British and Empire troops used well-developed combined arms tactics to break through successive lines of defence. By the end of September, all five of the BEF’s armies had reached the Hindenburg Line and were poised for the final advance.Each stage of the two month battle is given the same treatment, covering the details of the most talked about side of the campaign; the BEF’s side. Over fifty new maps chart the day by day progress of the five armies and together with the narrative, explain the British Army’s experience during the opening stages of the Advance to Victory. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counter-attacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the beginning of the Advance to Victory and learn how the British Army had mastered the art of attack.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force’s defensive battle on the Somme in March and April of 1918. It starts with the huge German offensive along a 60 mile front on 21 March. Third and Fifth Armies then had to make a series of fighting withdrawals in which some battalions had to fight their way out while others were overrun.Over the days that followed, men were called upon to fight all day against overwhelming numbers and then march all night to escape. After three years in the trenches, men had to battle in the open without tanks and often without artillery support. As communications failed, battalion and company commanders found themselves having to command in what was essentially a desperate infantry struggle.Each stage of the two week battle is given the same treatment, covering details about the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. It explains how the British soldier time and again stood and fought. Over fifty new maps chart the day by day progress of each corps on each day.Together the narrative and the maps explain the British Army’s experience during a fraught battle for survival. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counterattacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the Somme 1918 campaign and learn how the British Army’s brave soldiers fought and died trying to stop the onslaught.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    Cambrai Campaign 1917 is an account of the British Expeditionary Force’s battles in November and December of 1917. It starts with the plan to carry out a tank raid on the Hindenburg Line at Cambrai. The raid grew into a full scale attack and Third Army would rely on a different style of attack. The preliminary bombardment would be done away with and the troops would assemble in secret.Predicted fire had reached such a level of accuracy that 1,000 guns could hit targets without registration. Meanwhile, over 375 tanks would lead the infantry through the Hindenburg Line, ripping holes in the wire and suppressing the enemy. The study of the German counterattack ten days later, illustrates the different tactics they used and the British experience on the defensive.Each stage of the battle is given equal treatment, with detailed insights into the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. It explains how far the Tank Corps had come in changing the face of trench warfare. Over forty new maps chart the day by day progress of each corps on each day.Together the narrative and the maps provide an insight into the British Army’s experience during this important campaign. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counterattacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross.Discover the Cambrai campaign and learn how the British Army’s brave soldiers fought and died fighting to achieve their objectives.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    This is an account of the British Expeditionary Force’s battles in the summer and autumn of 1917. It begins with the Allied plan to free up the Flanders coast, to limit German naval and submarine attacks on British shipping.The opening offensive began with the detonation of nineteen mines on 7 June and ended with the capture of the Messines Ridge. The main offensive started with success on 31 July but was soon bogged down due to the August rains. Three huge attacks between 20 September and 4 October had the Germans reeling, but again the weather intervened and the campaign concluded with futile attacks across the muddy slopes of the Passchendaele Ridge.Each large battle and minor action is given equal treatment, giving a detailed insight into the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side. There are details on the planning of each offensive and the changing tactics used by both sides. There is discussion about how the infantry, the artillery, the cavalry, the engineers and Royal Flying Corps worked together. Over sixty new maps chart the day-by-day progress of each battle and action.Together the narrative and maps provide an insight into the British Army’s experience during this important campaign. The men who made a difference are mentioned; those who led the advances, those who stopped the counterattacks and those who were awarded the Victoria Cross. Discover the Passchendaele campaign and learn how the British Army’s brave soldiers fought and died fighting for their objectives.

  • - England's Dukes, Marquesses and Earls: 1066-1707
    by Andrew Rawson
    £3.99

    This is the history of England's turbulent times, told through the stories of the country's nobility. The book begins with the Norman Conquest in 1066 and ends with the union of England and Scotland in 1707. The nobility fought wars against Scotland in the north and against France on the Continent. They conquered Ireland and Wales and then had to deal with the rebellions that followed. This is the story of their abduction plots and assassination attempts and the brutal retribution when the treachery failed. It recalls the barons' rebellions and the peasant uprisings against the king. It also explains the reasons behind the family factions who fought for the crown, the most famous example being the War of the Roses. Also covered are the noble marriages arranged by the king to reward loyalty and maintain the balance of power. It tells of the children betrothed to marry, the failed marriages of convenience and the secret marriages for love. Learn how Henry VIII introduced new problems when he appointed himself head of the Church of England. Successive monarchs switched between the new church and the Catholic Church. Then there was the challenge to Charles I's rule in the Civil Wars. The story ends with the union of England and Scotland and the creation of Great Britain in 1707. It was also the end of the period of treachery and retribution which had plagued the English crown for nearly 650 years.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £7.99

    This book is a chronology of the Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and the famous victory drive of the Seventh Army. It starts at the Worms' Rhine bridgehead and moves quickly onto Aschaffenburg, before describing the Hammelburg Raid to release US POWs. The seizure of Nuremberg was hugely symbolic and this beautiful city was the scene both of the infamous Nazi Rallies and of course the War Crimes Tribunals. The road to Munich, always worth visiting (bierfest or no bierfest!) is via the Danube crossings and the book takes in the liberation of the appalling Dachau Concentration Camp and the battle at the SS Barracks. Munich was the center of Hitler's early life and represented his power base. He was imprisoned here and wrote Mein Kampf. The book climaxes with the approach to the Alps and the superb Eagle's Nest, so popular with tourists.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £3.99

    This book answers one of biggest unanswered questions asked by visitors to the Somme; where did my ancestor fight? The combination of First World War battle accounts and annotated trench maps throughout this book, explains exactly what happened and where, and indexed orders of battle give the reader a quick reference to locate individual units.But the book goes further than this as carefully chosen viewpoints, which are practical for anyone exploring in a car, have been suggested. They give the visitor different perspectives of the ground where their ancestors fought and died; and in many cases are buried in an unmarked grave.There is useful information on the structure of the British Army and the weapons, equipment and uniforms the men used. Information on the different methods of attacks used, the development of tactics and life in the trenches is also included. As well as this, there is a guide to the key cemeteries, memorials and museums the visitor should consider seeing to complete a visit.This book will help the casual visitor walk in their ancestor’s footsteps across the Somme battlefield. It will also guide the regular visitor across different areas of the battlefield, away from the popular points, and help all visitors accomplish the rewarding experience of connecting the battles of the past with the terrain of today.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    The camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau were an important part of the Nazis' final solution to the Jewish question. Over one million people were murdered in its gas chambers and tens of thousands of prisoners were worked to death in the nearby sub-camps. Others were held in the quarantine area before they were deported to work in the Third Reich.**This is the story of the development of Auschwitz from a Polish prison camp into a concentration camp, and a thorough account of the building of Birkenau and the gas chambers, which grew into industrial killing machines. Rawson relates what life was like for prisoners, revealing where the unsuspecting new arrivals came from and how they were greeted at the camp with the humiliating selection process; how many were tricked into entering the gas chambers, while others were stripped of their identity and put to work; how prisoners struggled to survive on a poor diet and no health care; how they faced a grinding daily routine with frequent punishments; and how the camps were organized from the commandants, their assistants and the guards, to the kapos and stuben who supervised work parties and the barracks. He details how a few brave souls tried to resist, how even fewer made a break for freedom and the heartbreaking story of liberation and life afterwards. **There are instructions on how to get to nearby Krakow - an ideal base - and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Information on how best to spend your time there is also included, making this an invaluable book that is both a vivid account of life in the concentration camps and an essential guide for visitors who want to explore the past of this notorious site.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    The five and a half month long Somme campaign in the summer and autumn of 1916 was a defining moment in the history of the British Army. From the disastrous opening day on 1 July to the final attacks in November, each large battle and minor action is given equal treatment inside these pages.*The book concentrates on the British Army's repeated efforts to first break through the enemy lines,and then to wear down the German in a bloody war of attrition. By compiling information from the Official History and the printed histories we get a balanced view of the most talked about side of the campaign, the British side.*You will find plenty of information on the reasoning behind each battle and the objectives. There is discussion on artillery bombardments, tactics, zero hours, the terrain and insights into the successes and failures of each attack. Over ninety new maps chart the day by day progress of Fourth and the Reserve Armyacross the rolling chalk downs of the Somme.*Together the narrative and mapsprovide an insight into the British Army's learning curve during that fateful summer; a learning curve which set the scene for future battles on the Western Front. We can see the hard lessons learnt and the solutions used to solve a multitude of problems, from communication and all arms co-operation, to the inclusion of tanks and the growing role of the Royal Flying Corps.*Where possible the men who made a difference are mentioned; the men who lead the assault companies and bombing teams, those who cut the wire and led the survivors into the German trenches, those who stopped the counterattacks and those awarded the Victoria Cross.*Discover the real Somme campaign fought by the British Army and learn how its brave soldiers fought hard to achieve their objectives.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £2.99

    Describes the fierce campaign, codenamed INFATUATE, mounted in November 1944 to clear the way through to the port of Antwerp. The book describes the extraordinary courage of the Germans who fought to the bitter end.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £9.49

    The rise of Hitler's Nazi Party is one of the defining phenomena of the twentieth century. The manner in which National Socialist ideologies took over life in Germany is difficult to comprehend over 75 years later. This fully illustrated book is a single volume encyclopedia on all aspects of this period in modern history. It starts with a shattered post-war Germany and charts the violent political tactics used by the Nazis to seize political control in 1933. The subsequent consolidation of power and brutal suppression of opponents followed as they took over all areas of society, introducing a new festival calendar to celebrate their takeover. The various military, political and youth organisations are considered, the Nazis' warped methods for maintaining law and order and their use of the press and propaganda to control the people and introduce their racial ideals. Chapters also cover art, culture, education, the economy, resistance, the leaders themselves, and more.

  • by Andrew Rawson
    £13.99

    The book covers everything from infantry, artillery, armour, special forces, riverine craft, intelligence, combat support and service units, to weapons and equipment, organisation, command and control, daily life and tours of duty, awards and medals. Films and books, memorials and the legacy of the Vietnam War in the USA and South East Asia are also covered.

  • - A Battlefield Guide
    by Andrew Rawson
    £7.99

    A new battlefield guide to the Peninsular War is long overdue. Modern development in Spain and Portugal has encroached on many of the battlefields, new research has questioned established interpretations of events, and there is a broader appreciation of the parts played by all the armies involved - the French on one side and the Spanish, Portuguese and British on the other. Andrew Rawson, in this highly illustrated and practical guide, offers a wide-ranging, up-to-date and balanced account of this prolonged conflict, and he guides the reader and the visitor across the terrain over which the armies marched and fought. He reconstructs the major battles in graphic detail, and provides practical tours of the major battlefields and campaigns. Also included are sections examining the armies, the military organization and tactics of the time and the role of the Spanish guerrillas. This guide to the Peninsular War will be essential reading for anyone who wants a concise and accessible introduction to the conflict, and it will serve as an invaluable reference guide for visitors who want to explore the sites of the fighting two centuries ago.

  • - French Flanders
    by Andrew Rawson
    £4.49

    In September 1915 Kitcherner's men were in action for the first time in the largest offensive of the year. Using gas, British troops managed to open a three mile gap in the German line. However, misuse of the reserves allowed the chance of success to pass by. In the following struggle for Hohenzollern Redboubt, the British were defeated time after time by superior weapons and tactics. For the first time visitors will be able to explore this key battle, a battle that cost the BEF over 50,000 casualties.

  • - French Flanders
    by Andrew Rawson
    £7.99

    The Battle of Loos formed part of a wider offensive conducted by both French and British Forces in September 1915. The British First Army, under the leadership of General Haig, were to break through the German line at Loos thanks in part to their superior numbers, while other operations were to achieve a similar result in Champagne and at Vimy Ridge. Due to lack of artillery the Loos attack was planned to be preceded by a massive gas attack. Chlorine gas would hopefully entirely overcome the Germans inadequate gas masks and lead to a swift breakthrough. Unfortunately all did not go to plan. First some of the gas was blown back into the British trenches causing over 2,000 casualties. Then when the assault itself took place the attackers were met by fierce German resistance, none more so than at Hill 70 where the German defences were strong. Despite many waves of attack, very few troops made it into enemy trenches. After a few days the attack had to be called off. It had cost 60,000 British casualties for virtually no gain. Rudyard Kipling's son John, serving with the Irish Guards, was also lost.

Join thousands of book lovers

Sign up to our newsletter and receive discounts and inspiration for your next reading experience.