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Books by David C. McClelland

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  • by David C. McClelland
    £37.99

    Human Motivation, originally published in 1987, offers a broad overview of theory and research from the perspective of a distinguished psychologist whose creative empirical studies of human motives span forty years. David McClelland describes methods for measuring motives, the development of motives out of natural incentives and the relationship of motives to emotions, to values and to performance under a variety of conditions. He examines four major motive systems - achievement, power, affiliation and avoidance - reviewing and evaluating research on how these motive systems affect behaviour. Scientific understanding of motives and their interaction, he argues, contributes to understanding of such diverse and important phenomena as the rise and fall of civilisations, the underlying causes of war, the rate of economic development, the nature of leadership, the reasons for authoritarian or democratic governing styles, the determinants of success in management and the factors responsible for health and illness. Students and instructors alike will find this book an exciting and readable presentation of the psychology of human motivation.

  • by David C. McClelland
    £21.49

    Synopsis coming soon.......

  • by David C. McClelland
    £4.99

    This book contains a summary of research on the achievement motive conducted mainly at Wesleyan University during the period January 1, 1947, to January 1, 1952, under the continuous moral and financial support of the Office of Naval Research. It provides a practicable method of measuring one of the most important human motives, a method, moreover, which in all probability can be applied to other motives with equal success. Secondly, the book contains what we believe to be an important contribution to psychological theory-at least to the theory of motivation. Finally, the book contains a great deal of information about the achievement motive and related variables.In personality theory there is inevitably a certain impatience-a desire to solve every problem at once so as to get the "e;whole"e; personality in focus. The authors have proceeded the other way. By concentrating on one problem, on one motive, they have found in the course of their study that they have learned not only a lot about the achievement motive but other areas of personality as well. So they feel that this book can be used as one basis for evaluating the degree to which a "e;piecemeal"e; approach to personality is profitable, an approach which proceeds to build up the total picture out of many small experiments by a slow process of going from fact to hypothesis and back to fact again.

  • by David C. McClelland
    £14.49

    Whilst the greatest effort has been made to ensure the quality of this text, due to the historical nature of this content, in some rare cases there may be minor issues with legibility. Working with concrete lives like this, as they proceed through the theoretical discussions in this book, should prevent students or anyone else from gaining the impression that I am trying to pre sent a system or a theory of personality. No one knows enough at present to build a theory. Rather what is needed and what I have tried to do is to find a number of constructs in terms of which we can collect data about personality, perhaps with the ultimate h0pe of building a theory. Anyone who thinks through the questions at the ends of the chapters, or who faces the problem of attempting to treat the bewildering variety of Karl's or anyone else's behavior in terms of the theoretical constructs used cannot fail to be impressed by how much there is to learn. But this is as it should be. The science of personality is only at its beginning and the student should know this above all other things.

  • by David C. McClelland & David H. Burnham
    £9.99

    In this provocative exploration into the nature and value of power in organizations, authors David McClelland and David Burnham reveal how the drive for influence is essential to good management. The authors provide a wealth of counterintuitive insights about what using power really means in today's business landscape. Power Is the Great Motivator is a must-read for all managers seeking to foster high morale and a strong sense of responsibility and commitment in their workforce. Since 1922, Harvard Business Review has been a leading source of breakthrough ideas in management practice. The Harvard Business Review Classics series now offers you the opportunity to make these seminal pieces a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world.

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