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Books by Gerald Dawe

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  • by Gerald Dawe
    £24.99

  • - Belfast Soulscapes
    by Gerald Dawe

  • - Northern Chronicles
    by Gerald Dawe
    £13.49 - 13.99

    Sequel to renowned poet and writer Gerald Dawe's highly acclaimed In Another World: Van Morrison and Belfast.Evocative record of the musical and literary influences that inspired and forged Dawe's awakening as a poet.

  • - Van Morrison & Belfast
    by Gerald Dawe
    £8.44 - 10.49

    In Another World is a unique trip through Belfast, mapped into the mystic through the timeless music of Van 'the Man' Morrison. The aptly soulful and inventive prose stems from the electric wit of acclaimed poet and fellow Belfast man, Gerald Dawe.Struck by the extraordinary brand of rhythm and blues that was Morrison's brainchild, Dawe's book is a celebration of the inspirations that underlie Morrison's music. Silhouetted in the work is Belfast, moody and vibrant, and the formative influence of the pre-Troubles northern capital on Morrison's musical direction.Dawe's writing transmutes the tender and unforgettable strains of Morrison's work, from the release in 1968 of Astral Weeks to the publication in 2014 of Lit Up Inside: Selected Lyrics. A powerful tribute to mark Van Morrison's accomplishments, In Another World taps into his legacy's eclectic soul and is kin to its enchantments.

  • - Essays on Cultural Belonging & Protestantism in Northern Ireland
    by Gerald Dawe

  • - Views and Interviews
    by Gerald Dawe
    £13.99

  • - Reflections on Modern Irish Writing
    by Gerald Dawe
    £29.49

    Of War and War's Alarms is a unique study of war and revolution and their impact on the writing lives of Irish poets and novelists from WW1 and the Easter Rising through the War of Independence to the Spanish Civil War, WWII and the Northern 'Troubles'.

  • - Collected Criticism-Ireland, Poetry, Politics
    by Gerald Dawe
    £23.49

    This collection of essays and reviews by one of Ireland's leading poets and critics moves from assessments of the work of individual poets' work to explorations of broader themes and topics in Irish cultural history.

  • - An Anthology of Irish War Poetry 1914-45
    by Gerald Dawe
    £9.49

    From the upheaval of the 1916 Rising to the Spanish Civil War, to the horrors of WW2, Earth Voices Whispering gathers together a wide range of voices that charts the human experience of war. Featuring AE, W.B Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon and many more.

  • by Gerald Dawe
    £20.49

    The Cambridge Companion to Irish Poets offers a fascinating introduction to Irish poetry from the seventeenth century to the present. Aimed primarily at lovers of poetry, it examines a wide range of poets, including household names, such as Jonathan Swift, Thomas Moore, W. B. Yeats, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Patrick Kavanagh, Eavan Boland and Paul Muldoon. The book is comprised of thirty chapters written by critics, leading scholars and poets, who bring an authoritative and accessible understanding to their subjects. Each chapter gives an overview of a poet's work and guides the general reader through the wider cultural, historical and comparative contexts. Exploring the dual traditions of English and Irish-speaking poets, this Companion represents the very best of Irish poetry and highlights understanding that reveals, in clear and accessible prose, the achievement of Irish poetry in a global context. It is a book that will help and guide general readers through the many achievements of Irish poets.

  • by Gerald Dawe
    £7.49

    A City Imagined is in praise of the city of Belfast. With a clear eye on the truths that history has demonstrated of the northern capital's sectarian and violent past, the memoir opens in the seemingly stable world of the 1950s, with Dawe enraptured by his mother's storytelling, which hinted at previous lives lived. Written in his highly regarded wry and lyrical style, Dawe's memoir sketches the outlines of his life as he starts to understand the city in which he was born, before embracing some of the local writers whose early work had such an influential part in nudging him in the direction of writing - poets, in the main, whose first books were read with the enthusiasm of a young man beguiled by the language and music of poetry. Building on the critical acclaim of In Another World: Van Morrison & Belfast and Looking Through You: Northern Chronicles, this third and final volume of the Northern Chronicles trilogy completes a fascinating and rich portrait of the celebrated poet's tangled and ever-evolving relationship with his native city.

  • - Essays on Cultural Belonging & Protestantism in Northern Ireland
    by Gerald Dawe
    £9.49

    The Sound of the Shuttle is an eloquent and compelling selection of essays written over four decades by Belfast-born poet Gerald Dawe, exploring the difficult and at times neglected territory of cultural belonging and northern Protestantism. The title, taken from a letter of John Keats during a journey through the north-east in 1818, evokes the lives, now erased from history, of the thousands of workers in the linen industry, tobacco factories and shipyards of Belfast.

  • - Essays on Modern Irish Writing
    by Gerald Dawe
    £3.49

    This engaging, personal chronicle by Irish poet Gerald Dawe explores the lives and times of leading Irish writers, including W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Samuel Beckett and Stewart Parker, alongside lesser-known names from the earlier decades of the twentieth century, such as Ethna Carberry, Alice Milligan, Joseph Campbell and George Reavey. It also portrays the changing cultural backgrounds of the author's contemporaries, such as Derek Mahon, Eavan Boland, Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Colm Toibin, Leontia Flynn and Sinead Morrissey. Gerald Dawe presents an accessible view of modern Irish literature, filtered perceptively through his own distinctive lens, and raises important questions about cultural belonging, the commercialisation of contemporary writing, and the influence of Irish literary culture in a digital age. In this lyrical exploration of national identity, The Wrong Country repositions our understanding of modern Irish writing in a wider context for today's readers.

  • by Michael Scott, Gerald Dawe, Peter Fallon, et al.
    £4.99

    Thomas Kilroy's long and distinguished career is celebrated in this volume by new essays, panel discussions and an interview, reconsidering the work of one of Ireland's most intellectually ambitious and technically imaginative playwrights. Contributors are drawn from both the academic and theatrical spheres, and include Nicholas Grene, Wayne Jordan, Patrick Mason, Christopher Murray and Lynne Parker. This volume follows Kilroy's own practice of connecting the creative and the critical, and publishes for the first time an extract from his play 'Blake'. Illustrated with photographs from major productions, this book also reproduces previously unseen materials from the Thomas Kilroy Collection held in the James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway. "e;One of the great challenges of all Kilroy's plays is posed by the extraordinary layers within them ... I suppose he remains one of the most challenging playwrights in the Irish canon to work with because he is working on all these levels"e;. Patrick Mason, Director

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