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Books by Martin Gayford

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  • - David Hockney in Normandy - A SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
    by Martin Gayford & David Hockney
    £19.99

    David Hockney reflects upon life and art as he journeys through lockdown in rural Normandy.

  • - From the Cave to the Computer Screen
    by Martin Gayford & David Hockney
    £14.49 - 23.99

    The making of pictures has a history going back perhaps 100,000 years to an African shell used as a paint palette. In this book, each chapter addresses an important question: What happens when we try to express reality in two dimensions? Why is the 'Mona Lisa' beautiful and why are shadows so rarely found in Chinese, Japanese and Persian painting?

  • by Martin Gayford & David Hockney
    £10.99

    David Hockney and Martin Gayford take children on a journey through art history, from early art drawn on cave walls to the images we make today on our computers and phone cameras.

  • - Sculpture from Prehistory to Now
    by Martin Gayford & Antony Gormley
    £27.44

    One of the greatest living sculptors and a well-known art critic examine the central role of sculpture in the development of human culture from prehistory to the present day.

  • - Paintings
    by Martin Gayford, Mark Hudson & Maurice Biriotti
    £34.49

    First published to accompany Piano Nobile's exhibiton at Piano Nobile Kings Place, Thomas Newbolt: Drama Paintings - A Modern Baroque, this fully colour illustrated book presents a substantial publication on contemporary artist Thomas Newbolt.

  • by Martin Gayford
    £405.49

    With more than 480 illustrations, this is the most comprehensive publication to date on one of the greatest painters of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, Lucien Freud

  • by Martin Gayford & Sarah Howgate
    £9.49

    This revelatory publication features a selection of beautifully reproduced images from his sketchbooks. Most of the sketches - which include works in pencil, pastel and watercolour from across the artist's long career - are published here for the first time. These fascinating images extend our understanding of Freud's work and demonstrate the scrutiny he brought to his subjects.

  • - The Copper Paintings
    by Martin Gayford
    £25.99

    Brings together, for the first time, Lucian Freud's oil on copper paintings, including his lost portrait of Francis Bacon and two works that have never been reproduced before.

  • - A Bigger Picture
    by Margaret Drabble, Martin Gayford, Marco Livingstone, et al.
    £9.49

    David Hockney (b 1937) has always been closely associated with Pop Art and California, where he has lived for much of his life. This study of his work redefines him as an important painter of the English countryside, addressing the artists place in the landscape tradition, his video works and their relationship to English landscape film-making.

  • - Travels, Encounters and Revelations
    by Martin Gayford
    £9.49 - 12.28

    One of our leading art critics and writers, Martin Gayford, recounts his travels and meetings with the world's greatest artists.

  • - Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters
    by Martin Gayford
    £9.49

    A masterfully narrated account of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s, illustrated throughout with documentary photographs and works of art

  • - Conversations with David Hockney
    by Martin Gayford
    £12.28 - 13.99

    A record of a private conversations with art critic Martin Gayford, this title reveals via reflection, anecdote, passion and humour the fruits of his lifelong meditations on the problems and paradoxes of representing a three-dimensional world on a flat surface.

  • - On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud
    by Martin Gayford
    £8.49

    Lucian Freud (1922-2011) spent seven months painting a portrait of the author who is an art critic. In this title, he describes the process chronologically, from the day he arrived for the first sitting through to his meeting with the couple who bought the finished painting.

  • - Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Nine Turbulent Weeks in Arles
    by Martin Gayford
    £5.49 - 9.49

    Two artistic giants. One small house. From October to December 1888 a pair of largely unknown artists lived under one roof in the French provincial town of Arles. Paul Gauguin and Vincent Van Gogh ate, drank, talked, argued, slept and painted in one of the most intense and astonishing creative outpourings in history. Yet as the weeks passed Van Gogh buckled under the strain, fought with his companion and committed an act of violence on himself that prompted Gauguin to flee without saying goodbye to his friend. The Yellow House is an intimate portrait of their time together as well as a subtle exploration of a fragile friendship, art, madness, genius and the shocking act of self-mutilation that the world has sought to explain ever since.

  • - His Epic Life
    by Martin Gayford
    £9.99 - 16.49

    At thirty one, Michelangelo was considered the finest artist in Italy, perhaps the world; long before he died at almost 90 he was widely believed to be the greatest sculptor or painter who had ever lived (and, by his enemies, to be an arrogant, uncouth, swindling miser).For decade after decade, he worked near the dynamic centre of events: the vortex at which European history was changing from Renaissance to Counter Reformation. Few of his works - including the huge frescoes of the Sistine Chapel Ceiling, the marble giant David and the Last Judgment - were small or easy to accomplish. Like a hero of classical mythology - such as Hercules, whose statue he carved in his youth - he was subject to constant trials and labours.In Michelangelo Martin Gayford describes what it felt like to be Michelangelo Buonarroti, and how he transformed forever our notion of what an artist could be.

  • - Love, Landscape, Money and the Making of a Great Painter
    by Martin Gayford
    £7.99 - 10.49

    When John Constable fell in love with Maria Bicknell, granddaughter of a Suffolk country neighbour, he little knew how long it would take to make her his wife. The impediment to their marriage was simple: 'that necessary article cash'. He was a painter without sufficient funds to support the daughter of a prominent London lawyer, and both he and her grandfather, the formidable (and sometimes comical) Rector of East Bergholt, disapproved of the match. It would be seven long, difficult years before they could marry, but in that time he would become one of the greatest painters of the nineteenth century.Martin Gayford writes superbly about Constable's early years as a painter and Maria and John's correspondence provides the lively backdrop to the story; one of lovers' tiffs, London versus country life, encounters with Turner, Byron and Wordsworth, royal scandals and rivalries at the Royal Academy. All the time, John Constable battles to become a painter who can earn his living and win Maria's hand.

  • by Martin Gayford & Philippe de Montebello
    £17.49

    A series of conversations between Philippe de Montebello and Martin Gayford exploring how we experience art, how we look at it, and how we think about it.

  • - David Hockney in Normandy
    by Martin Gayford & David Hockney
    £19.99

    We have lost touch with nature, rather foolishly as we are a part of it, not outside it. This will in time be over and then what? What have we learned?... The only real things in life are food and love, in that order, just like [for] our little dog Ruby... and the source of art is love. I love life. DAVID HOCKNEY ***PRE-ORDER NOW*** Praise for David Hockney and Martin Gayford's previous book, A History of Pictures: 'I won't read a more interesting book all year ... utterly fascinating' AN Wilson, Sunday Times 'A magic flight of a book... It's a measure of Hockney's vividness of perception that he can always put a cap on Gayford's knowledge ... fabulous' Clive James, Guardian Elegant and often surprising Hockney flags up a topic and Gayford gives the critical armature: it makes for a refreshing double act Michael Prodgers Books of the Year, Sunday Times 'An eloquent conversational testimony to the vividness of life lived through intelligent looking. You will see Caravaggio and Citizen Kane with fresh eyes' Daily Telegraph '[Hockney] asks big questions about the nature of picture-making and the relationship between painters and photography in a way that no other contemporary artist seems to do ... enormously good-humoured and entertaining ... On almost every page, there is an interesting provocation' Andrew Marr, New Statesman On turning eighty, David Hockney sought out rustic tranquillity for the first time: a place to watch the sunset and the change of the seasons; a place to keep the madness of the world at bay. So when Covid-19 and lockdown struck, it made little difference to life at La Grande Cour, the centuries-old Normandy farmhouse where Hockney set up a studio a year before, in time to paint the arrival of spring. In fact, he relished the enforced isolation as an opportunity for even greater devotion to his art. Spring Cannot be Cancelled is an uplifting manifesto that affirms arts capacity to divert and inspire. It is based on a wealth of new conversations and correspondence between Hockney and the art critic Martin Gayford, his long-time friend and collaborator. Their exchanges are illustrated by a selection of Hockneys new, unpublished Normandy iPad drawings and paintings alongside works by van Gogh, Monet, Bruegel, and others. We see how Hockney is propelled ever forward by his infectious enthusiasms and sense of wonder. A lifelong contrarian, he has been in the public eye for sixty years, yet remains entirely unconcerned by the view of critics or even history. He is utterly absorbed by his four acres of northern France and by the themes that have fascinated him for decades: light, colour, space, perception, water, trees. He has much to teach us, not only about how to see... but about how to live.

  • - Travels, Encounters and Revelations
    by Martin Gayford
    £13.49

    In the course of a career thinking and writing about art, Martin Gayford has travelled all over the world both to see works of art and to meet artists. Gayfords journeys, often to fairly inaccessible places, involve frustrations and complications, but also serendipitous encounters and outcomes, which he makes as much a part of the story as the final destination. Entertaining and informative, Gayford includes trips to see Brancusis Endless Column in Romania, prehistoric cave art in France, the museum island of Naoshima in Japan, the Judd Foundation in Marfa, Texas, and a Roni Horn work in Iceland. Interwoven with these accounts are journeys to meet artists Robert Rauschenberg in New York, Marina Abramovic in Venice, Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris or travels with artists, such as a trip to Beijing with Gilbert & George. These encounters not only provide insights into the way artists approach and think about their art but also reveal the importance of their personal environments. And in the process, Gayford discusses how these meetings have impacted on his own evolving ideas and tastes.

  • - Bacon, Freud, Hockney and the London Painters
    by Martin Gayford
    £10.49

    The development of painting in London from the Second World War to the 1970s is the story of interlinking friendships, shared experiences and artistic concerns among a number of acclaimed artists, including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, David Hockney, Bridget Riley, Gillian Ayres, Frank Bowling and Howard Hodgkin. Drawing on extensive first-hand interviews, many previously unpublished, with important witnesses and participants, the art critic Martin Gayford teases out the thread connecting these individual lives, and demonstrates how painting thrived in London against the backdrop of Soho bohemia in the 1940s and 1950s and Swinging London in the 1960s. He shows how, influenced by such different teachers as David Bomberg and William Coldstream, and aware of the work of contemporaries such as Jackson Pollock as well as the traditions of Western art from Piero della Francesca to Picasso and Matisse, the postwar painters were allied in their confidence that this ancient medium, in opposition to photography and other media, could do fresh and marvellous things. They asked the question what can painting do? and explored in their diverse ways, but with equal passion, the possibilities of paint.

  • - From the Cave to the Computer Screen
    by Martin Gayford & David Hockney
    £15.99

    The making of pictures has a history going back perhaps 100,000 years to an African shell used as a paint palette. Two-thirds of it is irrevocably lost, since the earliest images known to us are from about 40,000 years ago. But what a 40,000 years, explored here by David Hockney and Martin Gayford in a brilliantly original book. They privilege no medium, or period, or style, but instead, in 16 chapters, discuss how and why pictures have been made, and insistently link art to human skills and human needs. Each chapter addresses an important question: What happens when we try to express reality in two dimensions? Why is the Mona Lisa beautiful and why are shadows so rarely found in Chinese, Japanese and Persian painting? Why are optical projections always going to be more beautiful than HD television can ever be? How have the makers of images depicted movement? What makes marks on a flat surface interesting? Energized by two lifetimes of looking at pictures, combined with a great artists 70-year experience of experimentation as he makes them, this profoundly moving and enlightening volume will be the art book of the decade.

  • - Conversations with David Hockney
    by Martin Gayford
    £13.49

    David Hockney is possibly the worlds most popular living painter, but he is also something else: an incisive and original thinker on art. Here are the fruits of his lifelong meditations on the problems and paradoxes of representing a three-dimensional world on a flat surface. How does drawing make one see things clearer, and clearer, and clearer still, as Hockney suggests? What significance do different media from a Lascaux cave wall to an iPad have for the way we see? What is the relationship between the images we make and the reality around us? How have changes in technology affected the way artists depict the world? The conversations are punctuated by wise and witty observations from both parties on numerous other artists Van Gogh or Vermeer, Caravaggio, Monet, Picasso and enlivened by shrewd insights into the contrasting social and physical landscapes of California, where Hockney lives, and Yorkshire, his birthplace. Some of the people he has encountered along the way from Henri Cartier-Bresson to Billy Wilder make entertaining appearances in the dialogue.

  • by Martin Gayford & Philippe de Montebello
    £19.99

    This unique, richly illustrated book confronts the elusive questions: how, and why, do we look at art? Beginning with an enigmatic fragment of yellow jasper - all that is left of the face of an Egyptian woman who lived 3,500 years ago - Philippe de Montebello, longest-serving director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and art critic Martin Gayford met and talked on two continents and in six countries in art galleries, churches and museums. Whether they were in the Louvre or the Prado, the Mauritshuis or the Pitti, they reveal the pleasures - and some of the pitfalls - of truly looking at works of art. This is neither a work of art history nor of criticism - though it touches on both. The result is highly unusual and very personal: a book about what it feels like to experience pictures and sculptures.

  • - On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud
    by Martin Gayford
    £8.99

    Lucian Freud is widely regarded as the greatest figurative painter of our time. Freud spent seven months painting a portrait of the art critic Martin Gayford and the daily narrative of their encounters takes the reader straight into the artist's studio, and to the heart of Freud's working methods, both technical and psychological. Full of wry and revealing observations, this is a book not quite like any other: the inside story of how it feels to pose for a remarkable artist, and be transformed into a work of art. This is not a biography, but a series of close-ups: the artist at work, and in conversation in restaurants, in taxis and in his studio. It takes one into the company of the painter for whom Picasso, Giacometti and Francis Bacon were friends. 'One of the best books about art, and the making of art, that I have ever read' - Julian Barnes. Note: The ebook edition includes the complete text of the printed book with a reduced number of illustrations.

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