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Books in the Pan Heritage Classics series

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  • by Countess of Ranfurly Ranfurly & Hermione
    £9.49

    An inspired memoir, spanning over the Second World War, from a powerfully independent Countess who wouldn't take no for an answer

  • by A. J. Cronin
    £9.49

    Dr Finlay's Casebook brings together Adventures of a Black Bag and Dr Finlay of Tannochbrae, A. J. Cronin's two hugely popular collections featuring his most famous creation, Dr Finlay.Set in and around the fictional Scottish town of Levenford and village of Tannochbrae during the inter-war years, the stories found here are heart-warming, funny and touching, full of fascinating characters and unforgettable encounters. Made famous by the much-loved adaptations for radio and television, the classic tales of Dr Finlay, his senior colleague Dr Cameron, and their unruffled housekeeper Janet, remain as fresh and entertaining now as they were upon first publication.

  • by Anabel Donald
    £3.49 - 9.99

    An Uncommon Murder is the first detective novel in Anabel Donald's acclaimed Notting Hill series.'I'm twenty-eight. I'm a freelance TV researcher. And last November I investigated my first murder . . .' Alex Tanner is always on the lookout for work - mortgages on flats in Notting Hill don't come cheap after all and she only has herself to rely on. So when TV producer Barty O'Neill mentions a particularly juicy assignment for his latest documentary she jumps at the chance.Barty sends Alex to investigate the shooting of Lord Sherman, who was a member of London's high society in the 50s, and whose case remains unresolved. Alex hopes that a governess of the family, Miss Sarah Potter, will help untangle the truth, or will she lead Alex down another hidden path of the family's privileged history?

  • - A Childhood Memoir
    by Christopher Milne
    £9.49

    Now the subject of major Disney film starring Ewan McGregor, this is Christopher Robin in his own words.Millions of readers throughout the world have grown up with the stories and verses of A. A. Milne; have envied Christopher Robin in his enchanted world; laughed at Pooh - a bear of very little brain - and worried about Piglet and his problems. But what was it like to be the small boy with the long hair, smock and wellington boots?At the age of fifty-four Christopher Milne recalled his early childhood, remembering 'the enchanted places' where he used to play in Sussex. The Hundred Acre Wood, Galleon's Lap and Poohsticks Bridge existed not only in the stories and poems but were part of the real world surrounding the Milne home at Cotchford Farm.With deftness and artistry Milne draws a memorable portrait of his father, and an evocative reconstruction of a happy childhood in London and Sussex. The Enchanted Places is a story told with humour and modesty.

  • - A Novel of Elizabethan England
    by Winston Graham
    £9.49

    Set in the last years of Elizabeth I's reign, Winston Graham's The Grove of Eagles seamlessly blends historical fact and fiction in a rich tale full of unforgettable characters.In 1588 the Spanish Armada had been defeated in the English Channel and the whole of Elizabethan England was alert for the revenge that surely had to follow. On the Cornish coast, men like John Killigrew - in charge of the castle at Pendennis - were vital to the survival of the country, and on their backs rested the trust of those defending the nation. His eldest but base-born son, Maugan, emerges in the novel, through his loneliness and his love, as a touchingly honest and believable character who is, above all things, a man of his word.

  • by Ann Cleeves
    £9.49

    A Bird in the Hand is the first novel featuring George and Molly Palmer-Jones by Ann Cleeves, author of the Shetland and Vera Stanhope crime series.In England's birdwatching paradise, a new breed has been sighted - a murderer . . .Young Tom French was found dead, lying in a marsh on the Norfolk coast, with his head bashed in and his binoculars still around his neck. One of the best birders in England, Tom had put the village of Rushy on the birdwatching map. Everyone liked him. Or did they?George Palmer-Jones, an elderly birdwatcher who decided quietly to look into the brutal crime, discovered mixed feelings aplenty. Still, he remained baffled by a deed that could have been motivated by thwarted love, pure envy, or something else altogether.But as he and his fellow "e;twitchers"e; flocked from Norfolk to Scotland to the Scilly Isles, in response to rumours of rare sightings, George - with help from his lovely wife, Molly - gradually discerned the true markings of a killer. All he had to do was prove it . . . before the murderer strikes again.

  • by Ann Cleeves
    £9.49

    A Day in the Death of Dorothea Cassidy is the third novel in the Inspector Ramsay series by Ann Cleeves, author of the Shetland and Vera Stanhope crime series.For Dorothea Cassidy Thursdays were special. Every week she would look forward to the one day she could call her own, and would plan to visit people she wanted to see as a welcome respite from the routine duties that being a vicar's wife entailed. But one Thursday in June was to be more special than any other. It was the day that Dorothea Cassidy was strangled.As the small town of Otterbridge prepares for its summer carnival, Inspector Stephen Ramsay begins a painstaking reconstruction of Dorothea's last hours. He soon discovers that she had taken on a number of deserving cases - a sick and lonely old woman, a disturbed adolescent, a compulsive gambler, a single mother with a violent boyfriend and a child in care - and even her close family have their secrets to hide. All these people are haunted, in one way or another, by Dorothea's goodness. But which of them could have possibly wanted her dead?It is not until a second body is discovered that Ramsay starts to understand how Dorothea lived - and why she died. With the carnival festivities in full swing and dusk falling in Otterbridge, Ramsay's murder investigation reaches its chilling climax . . .

  • by John Greenwood
    £8.99

    After seventeen years, Brenda Cryer returns to the tiny Lancashire village of Parson's Fold with a shadowy past and a mysterious fortune. Shortly afterwards she is shot dead, and the one possible witness - her invalid mother - is missing . . .The only man available for the job is the notoriously slow and old-fashioned Inspector Mosley, but this case is a radical departure for a man more used to locating missing geese than tracking down a coldblooded killer. And it doesn't help that Mosley refuses to use forensics or computers, preferring to trust 'intuition' and a network of gossips, busybodies and village idlers to get to the bottom of things.Luckily, high-flying Sergeant Beamish - fresh out of the police academy and nursing a penchant for technology - has been tasked to keep an eye on the unpredictable Mosley. Keen to establish the superiority of his methods, Beamish sets out to solve the mystery by himself but somehow the grubby, balding and rumpled Mosley is always two steps ahead.Gentle, eccentric and an utter joy to read, Murder, Mr Mosley by John Greenwood brings together the wit and wordplay of P. G. Wodehouse with the classic character-led storytelling of G. K. Chesterton's Father Brown.

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