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  • - A History of the Crusades
    by Robert Payne
    £13.99

    This is a comprehensive account of the eight religious wars between the Christian West and the Muslim East that dominated the Middle Ages. Calling themselves "e;pilgrims of Christ,"e; thousands of Europeans from all stations in life undertook the harsh and bloody quest to reclaim Jerusalem, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, and Christ's tomb for Christendom.Robert Payne brings to life every step of the Crusaders' thousand-mile journey: the deprivation; the desperate, rapacious, and brutal raids for food and supplies; the epic battles for Antioch, Jerusalem, and Acre; the barbarous treatment of captives; and the quarrelling European princes who vied for power and wealth in the Near East. An epic tale of the glorious and the base, of unshakable faith and unspeakable atrocities, The Dream and the Tomb captures not only the events but the very essence of the Crusades.

  • - Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945
    by Viscount Field-Marshal Viscount William Slim
    £15.49

    Field Marshal Viscount Slim (1891-1970) led shattered British forces from Burma to India in one of the lesser-known but more nightmarish retreats of World War II. He then restored his army's fighting capabilities and morale with virtually no support from home and counterattacked. His army's slaughter of Japanese troops ultimately liberated India and Burma.The first edition of Defeat Into Victory , published in 1956, was an immediate sensation selling 20,000 copies within a few days. This is an updated version with a new introduction by David W. Hogan Jr.

  • by Paul Oppenheimer
    £20.99

    The most popular painter of his day, yet an artist whose reputation has fluctuated among art scholars and critics of the succeeding centuries, Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) is chiefly remembered today for his large canvases of sensual gardens, religious scenes, and voluptuous Rubenesque women. In Oppenheimers account of his life, Rubens emerges not only as a talented painter but also as an intellectual with a unique conception of beauty that proved very influential and ahead of his time. Oppenheimer explores Rubens ideas as he tells the story of his life, which included years as a diplomat, and illuminates his response to the humanism of the Renaissance in which he lived.

  • - A Biography
    by Jasper Ridley
    £15.49

    Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) was the founder of Fascism and iron-fisted ruler of Italy for two decades. He was also an extremely able politician who won the esteem of many statesmen-including Winston Churchill and influential persons in the United States.This biography describes Mussolini's childhood; his education (including his suspension from school for attacking other boys with knives); his World War I experiences and severe wounding; his involvement in, and eventual expulsion from the revolutionary Italian Socialist Party; his numerous love affairs, his early career as a journalist and his rise to power and brutal rule.

  • - The Life of Dean Martin
    by William Schoell
    £12.99

    Martini Man goes beyond the simple caricature of the boozy lounge singer with a penchant for racy humor to reveal the substantive man behind that mask. Although Martin's movie roles receive in-depth attention in this incisive biography, as does his career-defining partnership with Jerry Lewis, details of Dino's personal life also abound, such as how Shierly MacLaine dropped by his house "e;to tell Dean she was in love with him-even though his wife was in the other room."e; William Schoell's chronicle is a sympathetic portrait that recreates the life and times of one of America's favorite entertainers.

  • - An Autobiography
    by Hans Christain Anderson
    £18.49

    Danish poet and novelist Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875) is best known for the dozens of fairy tales he wrote, including "e;The Little Mermaid,"e; "e;The Ugly Duckling,"e; and "e;The Snow Queen."e; Andersen's sense of fantasy, power of description, and acute sensitivity are strikingly evident in his autobiography. Andersen masterfully depicts the extreme poverty of his provincial childhood and the international celebrity of his later years, and also provides insights into the sources of many of his most famous tales.

  • - Roman General and Dictator
    by G. P. Baker
    £12.99

    Lucius Cornelius Sulla (138-78 BC), soldier, politician, and statesman, set the standard of dictator for the generations that followed his death-the most famous dictator to follow Sulla's systematic path to power was Julius Caesar. In his lifetime, Sulla faced issues such as the decay of religious faith, the end of the aristocracy, the rise of the proletariat, and the growth of international finance. It was unquestionably a momentous era in the world's history, and Sulla's story is a tale of the Roman ambition par excellence: alliances, battles against rival Roman armies, plots, assassinations, and a civil war initiated by Sulla himself in which he seized power.

  • - The Ordeal of France 1940-1944
    by Ian Ousby
    £12.99

    France was slow and somewhat ineffectual in organizing resistance movement. In Occupation Ian Ousby challenges the myth that France was liberated "e; by the whole of France."e; The author explores the Nazi occupation of France with superb detail and eyewitness accounts that range from famous figures like Simone de Beauvoir, Charles de Gaulle, Andre Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre and Gertrude Stein to ordinary citizens, forgotten heroes and traitors.

  • by G. P. Baker
    £12.99

    Hannibal forged a career of daring exploits and stunning victories that came perilously close to annihilating Rome.

  • - An Autobiography
    by Kathryn Cullen-Dupont
    £16.49

    Story of a remarkable life and the history of a movement.

  • - Tales of Courage and Conflict
    by Count Leo Tolstoy
    £18.49

    Russian novelist and philospher Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) is best known for his monumental novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina, but his reputation as a master of short fiction is richly evident in this unparalleled anthology. Here, in the largest one-volume collection available, are 36 stories of war, intrigue, treachery, murder, moral turmoil, spiritual anguish, and occasional redemption. They include early stories like the famed "e;Sevastopol"e; tales of warfare and "e;Lost on the Steppe;"e; the tour de force novellas "e;The Death of Ivan Ilyitch"e; and "e;The Kreutzer Sonata;"e; as well as folk tales, parables, realistic tales, and many lesser-known gems.

  • - The Will to Swing
    by Gene Lees
    £12.99

    An engaging biography of a living musical legend, Oscar Peterson. A man Duke Ellington once called the "e; maharajah of the piano."e; Gene Lees carefully builds up the portrait of Peterson, his childhood and what it meant to be be black and talented in Montreal in the 1940s, hist three marriages and six children, his musical partners (Ray Brown, Herb Ellis and Ed Thigpen), his musical friends and colleagues (Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Tatum and Lester Young, amongst others) and the critical controversy and mythology that have long surrounded Peterson. This updated version has a new chapter that covers Peterson's appointment as Chancellor of York University; his receipt of ten honorary doctorates and the Order of Canada; his stroke and partial recovery; the origins and fallout of his cancelled North American tour and much more.

  • - An Extraordinary Memoir of Survival
    by Sam Kessel
    £10.99

    A Jewish member of the French Resistance, Sim Kessel lived for almost three years in Nazi captivity. The bulk of his time was at the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he survived torture, starvation, and even his own public execution through extraordinary luck. His remarkable and terrifying story shows in knowing and intimate detail how guards and kapos under the Nazi system degenerated into conscienceless killers, and how the desperate scramble to survive dehumanized Kessel's fellow prisoners.

  • - Son and Playwright
    by Louis Scheaffer
    £15.49

    The most lauded playwright in American history, Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) won four Pulitzer Prizes and a Nobel Prize for a body of work that includes The Iceman Cometh, Mourning Becomes Electra, Desire Under the Elms, and Long Day's Journey into Night. His life, the direct source for so much of his art, was one of personal tumult from the very beginning. The son of a famous actor and a quiet, morphine-addicted mother, O'Neill had experienced alcoholism, a collapse of his health, and bouts of mania while still a young man. Based on years of extensive research and access to previously untapped sources, Sheaffer's authoritative biography examines how the pain of O'Neill's childhood fed his desire to write dramas and affected his artistically successful and emotionally disastrous life.

  • - Plattsburgh, the War of 1812's Most Decisive Battle
    by Colonel David Fitz-Enz
    £19.49

    A major event in both America's history and the European wars of the nineteenth century, the War of 1812's Battle of Plattsburgh saw the largest invasion ever of a foreign military into the United States, as the British army and navy, fresh from victories against Napoleon, attempted to conquer Lake Champlain and its shores. Their plan was to seize control of key waterways and port cities, a move that would cripple America's defenses. Outnumbered and outgunned, the U. S. land and sea forces fought the British ships and troops to a standstill, allowing the leader of the American fleet, Lieutenant Thomas Macdonough, to carry out a brilliant maneuver which ensured an American victory. Author Fitz-Enz researched and produced a companion PBS documentary that examined the leaders on both sides of the conflict and their actions during the battle. His research brought to light numerous documents, including diaries and secret battle orders, that reveal new insights into the battle. His descriptions of the confrontation in the pages of The Final Invasion bring to vivid life the cannon blasts that tore through ships and their crews and the rush of infantry storming the fortifications around the city. Endorsed by the U. S. Army War College, The Final Invasion is a thrilling look at a pivotal moment in American and world history.

  • - Persecution, Deportation, and Murder, 1933-1945
    by Michel Reynaud & Sylvie Graffard
    £18.49

    The Jehovah's Witnesses endured intense persecution under the Nazi regime, from 1933 to 1945. Unlike the Jews and others persecuted and killed by virtue of their birth, Jehovah's Witnesses had the opportunity to escape persecution and personal harm by renouncing their religious beliefs. The vast majority refused and throughout their struggle, continued to meet, preach, and distribute literature. In the face of torture, maltreatment in concentration camps, and sometimes execution, this unique group won the respect of many contemporaries. Up until now, little has been known of their particular persecution.

  • - Son and Artist
    by Louis Scheaffer
    £16.49

    The most lauded playwright in American history, Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) won four Pulitzer Prizes and a Nobel Prize for a body of work that includes The Iceman Cometh, Mourning Becomes Electra, Desire Under the Elms, and Long Day's Journey into Night. His life, the direct source for so much of his art, was one of personal tumult from the very beginning. The son of a famous actor and a quiet, morphine-addicted mother, O'Neill had experienced alcoholism, a collapse of his health, and bouts of mania while still a young man. Based on years of extensive research and access to previously untapped sources, Sheaffer's authoritative biography examines how the pain of O'Neill's childhood fed his desire to write dramas and affected his artistically successful and emotionally disastrous life.

  • - The Last Roman Emporer
    by G. P. Baker
    £21.99

    Justinian (482-565 A.D.), who ruled the Roman Empire from his capital in Constantinople, was, along with his wife Empress Theodora, one of the most scandalous monarchs in history. During his reign, Justinian oversaw the construction of the Hagia Sophia, one of the wonders of the ancient world, and he strove to maintain Rome's territories. Yet despite the heights reached under his rule, the time was one of revolts, intrigues, and brutality to his subjects. Baker's biography takes a redemptive view of Justinian and his wife, both of whom were vilified by the chronicler Procopius, he for his despotism and she for her endless sexual escapades. Baker points out that Justinian also codified Roman law and brought other modern solutions to the problems that had plagued his empire for years. Baker also describes the battles of Justinian's famous general Belisarius, who waged successful wars against the Vandals, Goths, and Persians on behalf of his emperor.

  • - A Darker View
    by Jeffey Meyers
    £12.99

    The works of Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923), one of England's most gifted short story writers, have influenced over eight decades of writers. A friend to Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, and Bertrand Russell, Mansfield left a literary legacy collected in The Garden Party, In a German Pension, and numerous anthologies. Biographies appearing after her death idealized her, but Meyers sets the record straight in his assessment of the author's life and career, revealing a woman with a self-destructive disdain for convention and respectability. Born and raised in New Zealand, Mansfield threw herself into several love affairs with men and women before living with literary critic John Middleton Murray. Meyers chronicles their tempestuous relationship (one that mixed abuse with devotion) and the years she fought a losing battle with tuberculosis.

  • - The Untold Story
    by Thomas Hoving
    £12.99

    The discovery of Tutankhamun's treasure-filled tomb is one of the greatest events in modern archeology. It is also a story so filled with intrigues, accusations, international imbroglios, and lasting scandals that it forever altered the way archaeological expeditions were organized and conducted. Hoving's Tutankhamun focuses on Howard Carter, the archaeologist who persisted for six years in his search in the Valley of the Kings for Tutankhamun's tomb. Other major figures in the discovery include: Carter's patron Lord Carnarvon, who died shortly after entering the tomb, thus kindling rumors of a curse; Carter's rival Pierre Lacau, a French Jesuit who headed the Antiquities Service in Cairo and did everything he could to ruin Carter and deny his claim; the Egyptian authorities determined to keep the artifacts of their national heritage in their country; and Arthur Weigall and other Egyptologists who felt slighted by Carter's refusal to admit experts anywhere near his discovery.

  • - The German Generals' Plot Against Hitler
    by Pierre Galante
    £12.99

    The bomb that exploded in the "e;Wolf's Lair"e;-Hitler's command headquarters-on July 20th, 1944 was the closest any assassination attempt ever came to ridding the world of the Nazis' Fuhrer. Pierre Galante's account of the years that led up to the attempt, and its grim aftermath, offers an illuminating look at how dissent among the German officer corps grew until something had to be done. Conspirator General Adolf Heusinger, who met with Hitler on hundreds of occasions, provides his personal accounts of the disintegrating obedience of the German commanders as the war turned against them. Their plan to kill Hitler, establish a provisional government, and negotiate with the Allies for peace-known as Operation Valkyrie-is described here in depth.

  • - A Biographical History of Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin
    by Bertram D. Wolfe
    £15.49

    The lives of three men who made the Russian Revolution possible-Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin-are the focus of this biographical account of the rise of socialism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Bertram Wolfe, a political scientist and historian of Russia, knew Trotsky and Stalin personally, and here brings his profound insider's knowledge to bear on his subjects. Three Who Made a Revolution recounts the early lives and influences of the three leaders, and shows the development of their diverging ideologies as decades gave strength to their cause and brought Russia closer to its turning point, a revolution that would alter the course of the twentieth century.

  • - The Autobiography of Henry Mancini
    by Henry Mancini
    £12.99

    Best known for the "e;dead-ant"e; theme to the Pink Panther films, Henry Mancini also composed the music to Peter Gunn, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Orson Welles' Touch of Evil, and the Academy Award winning soundtracks to Victor/Victoria and The Days of Wine and Roses. In a career that lasted over thirty years, Mancini amassed twenty Grammy awards and more nominations than any other composer. In his memoir, written with jazz expert Lees, Mancini discusses his close friendships with Blake Edwards, Julie Andrews, and Paul Newman, his professional collaborations with Johnny Mercer, Luciano Pavarotti, and James Galway, and his achievements as a husband, father, and grandfather. A great memoir loaded with equal parts Hollywood glitz and Italian gusto.

  • - Tojo Against the World
    by Edwin P. Hoyt
    £11.99

    Vilified in the West as the Japanese equivalent of Hitler, Hideki Tojo (1884-1948) was in fact cut from very different cloth. Lacking the skills and charisma of a statesman, fueled by no apocalyptic visions, Tojo was an unimaginative soldier whose primary goals were to establish Japan's military strength and serve his emperor. Yet his determination and ambition caused him to participate in the seizure of power when the military took over the government. WWII scholar Hoyt, a resident of Japan, relies on new sources and remarkable insight to show how Tojo and the leaders of Japan's armed forces gained control of the country, but how ambition ultimately proved to be Tojo's undoing.

  • by John Charles Fremont
    £18.49

    During his remarkable life, John Charles Fremont served as a senator for the newly-formed state of California, led Union troops in the Civil War, and was governor of the territory of Arizona. His race for the presidency in 1856 brought prestige to the fledgling Republican Party, yet despite his popularity, his uncompromising determination to abolish slavery cost him the election. For all of his experiences in politics and the military, it was the earlier decades of Fremont's life that were the most exciting. Shortly after graduating from college, he joined a mapping expedition and surveyed the hills of South Carolina and Tennessee for the government. Eager to continue exploring, Fremont went on five more expeditions to America west of the Appalachians during the years from 1839 to 1846. He traveled up the Missouri river, crossed the Rocky Mountains, and reached the West Coast on several journeys, often with his friend Kit Carson, the legendary mountain man. In Memoirs of My Life, Fremont recounts those years in the wilderness, encountering the fabulous landscapes and native people of America's interior before the westward expansion of the U. S. His journeys across the unmapped prairies, mountains, and deserts offer a wonderful glimpse of North America's natural grandeur in its original state.

  • - And the Christian Revolution
    by G. P. Baker
    £12.99

    Roman Emperor Constantine is one of the most momentous figures in the history of Christianity, a ruler whose conversion turned the cult of Jesus into a world religion. Classical scholar Baker tells of the changing Roman world in which Constantine rose to power-an empire where feudalism was replacing the old senatorial government and the lands of the empire were split into two regions. It was also a place where customs from the East were replacing the old Roman values, preparing the way for the Byzantine Empire. Baker describes Constantine's unique conversion (which apparently did not prevent him from sacrificing to idols), his wars to control first the Roman army and then the Germans and the lands of Asia Minor, and finally the founding of Constantinople and the establishment of the monarchial system that dominated Europe for over a thousand years.

  • - Nazi Editor of the Notorious Anti-semitic Newspaper Der Sturmer
    by Randall Bytwerk
    £11.99

    The Nazis put a remarkable amount of effort into anti-Semitic propaganda, intending to bring ordinary Germans around to the destructive ideology of the Nazi party. Julius Streicher (1885-1946) spearheaded many of these efforts, publishing anti-Semitic articles and cartoons in his weekly newspaper, Der Sturmer, the most widely read paper in the Third Reich. Streicher won the close personal friendship of Hitler and Himmler, and drew deserved attacks from the world press. Bytwerk's biography examines Streicher's use of propaganda techniques, and the hate literature towards Jews that continued to appear after his death, bearing his influence.

  • - A Biography
    by Daniel James
    £11.99

    The controversial life and career of Ernesto Che Guevara (1928-1967) has earned the revolutionary leader admirers and detractors across the world. In his critical biography, Daniel James penetrates the myths that have grown up around Guevara since his death. The biography carefully analyzes the Cold War situations in which Guevara lived and fought, and which turned the young medical student into a guerilla and political theoretician. Che Guevara: A Biography includes interviews with Guevara's first wife, and extensive information on the revolutionary's early years and family life lacking in other biographies. James also discusses Guevara's actions in Cuba as a leader in the rebel army of Fidel Castro, covering in detail Guevara's military victories, his post-war executions of anti-Castro prisoners, and his criticism of Soviet Communism. This unique and unsparing portrait of Guevara includes and an in-depth examination of his last guerilla campaign in Bolivia.

  • by Federico Fellini & Charolette Chandler
    £13.99

    Forged from the many conversations Charlotte Chandler conducted with director Federico Fellini over the course of fourteen years, and featuring a forward by Billy Wilder, I, Fellini is a portrait of one of Italy's greatest filmmakers in his own words. In the book, Fellini recounts the stories behind his classic films La Dolce Vita, 8 1/2, La Strada, and others, describing the inspirations from which they arose and the struggles to get them filmed. He also speaks at length on actors Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Sophia Loren, and Anna Magnani, and on directors Roberto Rossellini, Ingmar Bergman, and Michelangelo Antonioni.

  • - An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the Fram, 1910-1912
    by Captain Roald Amundsen
    £19.99

    Roald Amundsen records his race to be the first man to reach the South Pole. Amundsen's expertise enabled him to succeed where his predecessors, and competitors, did not. His rival Captain Robert F. Scott not only failed to reach the Pole first, but-due to poor preparation and miscalculation-died with the rest of his party on their return trip. The South Pole remains one of the greatest and most important books on polar exploration.

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