We a good story
Quick delivery in the UK

Books published by Granta Publications

Filter
Filter
Genre
  • (285)
  • (10)
  • (119)
  • (7)
  • (35)
  • (31)
  • (52)
  • (93)
  • (205)
Type
  • (687)
  • (2)
Format
  • (687)
  • (1)
Language
  • (689)
Price
Series
  • (23)
  • (20)
  • (10)
  • (6)
  • (1)
Sort bySort Popular
  • by Ben Lerner
    £8.49

    In the past year, the narrator of 10:04 has enjoyed unexpected literary success, been diagnosed with a potentially fatal heart condition, and been asked by his best friend to help her conceive a child. Now, in a New York of increasingly frequent superstorms and political unrest, he must reckon with his biological mortality, the possibility of a literary afterlife, and the prospect of (unconventional) fatherhood in a city that might soon be under water.In prose that Jonathan Franzen has called 'hilarious... cracklingly intelligent... and original in every sentence', Lerner's new novel charts an exhilarating course through the contemporary landscape of sex, friendship, memory, art and politics, and captures what it is like to be alive right now.

  • - Animal Emotions and What They Teach Us about Ourselves
    by Frans de Waal
    £8.49

    Mama's Last Hug opens with the moving farewell between Mama, a dying chimpanzee matriarch, and her human friend, a professor who inspired the author's work. Their parting, the video of which has been watched by millions online, is not only a window into the deep bonds they shared, but into the remarkable emotional capacities of animals. In this groundbreaking and entertaining book, primatologist Frans de Waal draws on his renowned studies of the social and emotional lives of chimpanzees, bonobos and other primates, and personal encounters with many other species, to illuminate new ideas and findings about animal emotions: joy, grief, shame, love, pain and happiness. Exploring the facial expressions of animals, human and animal politics, and animal consciousness, de Waal illustrates how profoundly we have underestimated animals' emotional experiences. He argues that emotions occupy a far more significant place in the way we organise our societies than a more rationalist approach would advocate. His radical proposal is that emotions are like organs: humans haven't a single organ that other animals don't have, and the same can be said of our emotions.

  • by Lisa Halliday
    £8.49

    'A scorchingly intelligent first novel' New York Times'Spellbinding' New Yorker'Thrilling' GuardianIn New York, Alice, a young editor, begins an affair with Ezra Blazer, a world-famous, much older writer. At Heathrow airport, Amar, an Iraqi-American economist en route to Kurdistan, is detained by immigration. Somehow their lives are connected, in this unconventional love story that has things to say about all of contemporary life.

  • by Terence Cave
    £6.49

    Montaigne (1533-92) is commonly regarded as an early modern sceptic, standing at the threshold of a new secular way of thinking. He is also known for his ground-breaking exploration of the 'subject' or the 'self'. Terence Cave discusses these and other key aspects of the Essais (Montaigne's major work) not as philosophical themes but as features in the mapping of a mental landscape: the project of the Essais is cognitive rather than philosophical. Similarly, he reads the Essais not as 'essays' in the literary sense but as 'trials' or 'soundings' in which the manner of writing - the shape of the sentences, the use of metaphors and other figures - is crucial. Taking passages from many different chapters of the Essais, this book guides the reader through Montaigne's investigation of the 'subtle shades and stirrings' of the mind.

  • - The True Story Of India's Murderous Cult
    by Mike Dash
    £9.49

    Never in recorded history has there been a group of murderers as deadly as the Thugs. For nearly two centuries, groups of these lethal criminals haunted the roads of India, slaughtering travellers whom they met along the way with such efficiency that over the years tens of thousands of men, women and children simply vanished without trace. Mike Dash, one of our best popular historians, has devoted years to combing archives in both India and Britain to discover how the Thugs lived and worked. Painstakingly researched and grippingly written, Thug tells, for the first time the full story of the Thugs' rise and fall from the cult's beginnings in the late seventeenth century to its eventual demise at the hands of British East India Company officer William Sleeman in 1840.

  • by Michal Witkowski
    £8.49

  • by Mariana Enriquez
    £12.99

  • by Valerie Miles
    £13.99

    Granta 155: Best of Young Spanish-Language Novelists 2 showcases the work of twenty-five of the most exciting young writers in the Spanish speaking world, chosen by judges Chloe Aridjis, Horacio Castellanos Moya, Rodrigo Fres,n, Aurelio Major, Gaby Wood and guest editor Valerie Miles. Granta 155 is published simultaneously with Granta en Espa,ol 23: Los Mejores Narradores J,venes en Espa,ol 2, in Spain and in the US.Andrea Abreu (Spain) trans. Julia SanchesJos, Adiak Montoya (Nicaragua) trans. Samantha SchneeDavid Aliaga (Spain) trans. Daniel HahnCarlos Manuel ,lvarez (Cuba) trans. Frank WynneJos, Ardila (Colombia) trans. Lindsay Griffiths and Adri,n IzquierdoGonzalo Baz (Uruguay) trans. Christina MacSweeneyMiluska Benavides (Peru) trans. Katherine SilverMart,n Felipe Castagnet (Argentina) trans. Frances RiddleAndrea Chapela (Mexico) trans. Kelsi VanadaCamila Fabbri (Argentina) trans. Jennifer CroftPaulina Flores (Mexico) trans. Megan McDowellCarlos Fonseca (Costa Rica/Puerto Rico) trans. Megan McDowellMateo Garc,a Elizondo (Mexico) trans. Robin MyersAura Garc,a-Junco (Mexico) trans. Lizzie DavisMunir Hachemi (Spain) trans. Nick CaistorDainerys Machado Vento (Cuba) trans. Will VanderhydenEstanislao Medina Huesca (Equatorial Guinea) trans. Mara Faye LethemCristina Morales (Spain) trans. Kevin Gerry DunnAlejandro Morell,n (Spain) trans. Esther AllenMichel Nieva (Argentina) trans. Natasha WimmerM,nica Ojeda (Ecuador) trans. Sarah Booker Eudris Planche Sav,n (Cuba) trans. Margaret Jull CostaIrene Reyes-Noguerol (Spain) trans. Lucy GreavesAniela Rodr,guez (Mexico) trans. Sophie HughesDiego Z,,iga (Chile) trans. Megan McDowell

  • by Mike Higgins
    £18.49

    Which migrating birds fly the furthest? Which nations have launched which animals into space?Which countries' leaders don't believe in climate change?Where were our planet's now-extinct species last sighted?Where can you hug the world's oldest trees?Where could you find the largest gatherings of cockroaches?With maps that cover the entire globe, Wild Maps will delight lovers of maps and lovers of nature, as well as anyone with an interest in all that is fascinating and awe-inspiring in the world around us. Beautifully designed and illustrated, Wild Maps is an eye-opening celebration of our planet and the plants and animals with whom we share it.

  • by Austin Duffy
    £11.99

    Intravenous lines, catheters, bodies in distress, wounds: three young surgical interns working the night shift must care for - and keep alive - the influx of patients, while frightened and uncertain about what the night will throw at them.The Night Interns beautifully conjures the alien space of the hospital wards and corridors through the viewpoint of one of the interns, as he comes to terms with the bodily reality of the patients and the bizarre instruments of healing. Equally unsettling for the inexperienced junior staff are the dysfunctional hierarchies of the hospital workplace. Under intense pressure and with very little sleep, the interns become inured to their encounters with sickness, all the while searching for the meaning in their work.By turns moving, shocking, and darkly funny, The Night Interns fizzes with nervous energy, forensic insight and moral tension, as it evokes life and death on the frontline.

  • by Ian Wright
    £11.99

    Which nations have North Korean embassies? Which region has the highest number of death metal bands per capita? How many countries have bigger economies than California? Who drives on the 'wrong' side of the road? And where can you find lions in the wild?Revelatory, thought-provoking and fun, Brilliant Maps is a unique atlas of culture, history, politics and miscellanea, compiled by the editor of the iconic Brilliant Maps website. As visually arresting as Information is Beautiful and as full of surprising facts and figures as any encyclopaedia, Brilliant Maps is a stunning piece of cartography that maps our curious and varied planet.For graphic design enthusiasts, compulsive Wikipedia readers and those looking for the sort of gift they buy for someone else and wind up keeping for themselves, this book will change the way you see the world and your place in it.

  • by Nick Drnaso
    £18.49

    Every single person has something unique to them which is impossible to re-create, without exception. -John Smith, acting coachFrom the acclaimed author ofSabrina,Nick Drnaso'sActing Classcreates a tapestry of disconnect, distrust, and manipulation. Ten strangers are brought together under the tutelage of John Smith, a mysterious and morally questionable leader. The group of social misfits and restless searchers have one thing in common: they are out of step with their surroundings and desperate for change.A husband and wife, four years into their marriage and simmering in boredom. A single mother, her young son showing disturbing signs of mental instability. A peculiar woman with few if any friends and only her menial job keeping her grounded. A figure model, comfortable in his body and ready for a creative challenge. A worried grandmother and her adult granddaughter; a hulking laborer and gym nut; a physical therapist; an ex-con.With thrumming unease, the class sinks deeper into their lessons as the process demands increasing devotion. When the line between real life and imagination begins to blur, the group's deepest fears and desires are laid bare. Exploring the tension between who we are and how we present, Drnaso cracks open his characters' masks and takes us through an unsettling American journey.

  • by Sayaka Murata
    £11.99

    From the author of international bestseller Convenience Store Woman comes a collection of short fiction: weird, out of this world and like nothing you've read before.An engaged couple falls out over the husband's dislike of clothes and objects made from human materials; a young girl finds herself deeply enamoured with the curtain in her childhood bedroom; people honour their dead by eating them and then procreating. Published in English for the first time, this exclusive edition also includes the story that first brought Sayaka Murata international acclaim: 'A Clean Marriage', which tells the story of a happily asexual couple who must submit to some radical medical procedures if they are to conceive a longed-for child.Mixing taboo-breaking body horror with feminist revenge fables, old ladies who love each other and young women finding empathy and transformation in unlikely places, Life Ceremony is a wild ride to the outer edges of one of the most original minds in contemporary fiction.

  • by Kristin Kimball
    £9.49

    When Kristin Kimball fell in love with a farmer and left behind her life in Manhattan to start a new farm with him in the Adirondacks, she had to learn a lot about farming - and fast. But, it turns out that starting a farm is not as challenging as sustaining it. Over the next five years, as two children are born and more land is acquired, the farm has its ups and downs, but then the downs keep on coming. Kristin's husband gets injured, the weather turns against them, the financial pressures mount. Suddenly, Kristin is facing not only the daily juggle of planting and milking and putting dinner on the table, but bigger questions about the life she has chosen. Is she still a farmer or is she now a farmer's wife? What does the farm need in order to survive? What does a family need in order to thrive? Beautifully written and refreshingly honest, Good Husbandry is about farmers and food, friends and neighbours, love and marriage, birth and death, and about how to grow and harvest the good things in life.

  • by Sigrid Rausing
    £13.99

    From Nobel laureates to debut novelists, international translations to investigative journalism, each issue of Granta turns the attention of the world's best writers on to one aspect of the way we live now. This spring issue will feature award-winning writer William Atkins on the proposed nuclear power station Sizewell C, as well as memoir by Alejandro Zambra (tr. Megan McDowell), Lars Horn and Emmanuel Carr,re (tr. John Lambert), and fiction by Adam Foulds and Rebecca Sollom. With photoessays by Raphaela Rosella introduced by Nicole R. Fleetwood, Muhammad Salah introduced by Esther Kinsky, and Phalonne Pierre Louis introduced by Jason Allen-Paisant.

  • by Joseph Roth
    £8.49

    This novella, one of the most haunting things that Joseph Roth ever composed, was published in 1939, the year the author died. Like Andreas, the hero of the story, Roth drank himself to death in Paris, but this is not an autobiographical confession. Rather, it is a secular miracle-tale, in which the vagrant Andreas, after living under bridges, has a surprising run of good luck that changes his circumstances profoundly. The novella is extraordinarily compressed, dry-eyed and witty, despite its melancholic subject matter.

  • by Yoko Tawada
    £11.99

    *From the author of The Last Children of Tokyo*A mind-expanding, cheerfully dystopian novel about friendship, difference and what it means to belong, by a National Book Award-winning novelist.Welcome to the not-too-distant future. Japan, having vanished into the sea, is now remembered as 'the land of sushi'. Hiruko, a former citizen and a climate refugee herself, has a job teaching immigrant children in Denmark with her invented language Panska (Pan-Scandinavian): 'homemade language. no country to stay in. three countries I experienced. no time to learn three different languages. might mix up. insufficient space in brain. so made new language. homemade language most Scandinavian people understand'.Hiruko soon makes new friends to join her in her travels searching for anyone who can still speak her mother tongue: Knut, a graduate student in linguistics, who is fascinated by her Panska; Akash, an Indian man who lives as a woman, wearing a red sari; Nanook, an Eskimo from Greenland, first mistaken as another refugee from the land of sushi; and Nora, who works at the Karl Marx House in Trier. All these characters take turns narrating chapters, which feature an umami cooking competition; a dead whale; an ultra- nationalist named Breivik; Kakuzo robots; uranium; and an Andalusian bull fight. Episodic, vividly imagined and mesmerising, Scattered All Over the Earth is another sui generis masterwork by Yoko Tawada.

  • by Sandra Newman
    £13.99

    *Selected for 2022 previews by the Observer, the Guardian, the Daily Mail, & the Irish Times*'Intriguingly strange' The Bookseller, Editor's ChoiceIn a moment, in every part of the world, every person with an Y chromosome vanishes: lovers, children, parents - even foetuses from the womb.Jane Pearson wakes on a mountainside the next morning to find her husband and son missing from their tent. Frantic and grieving, she sets out to find the one person she thinks can help - Evangelyne Moreau, the brilliant, charismatic leader of the Commensalist Party of America, whose heart she broke many years before.While Jane searches for those she has lost, a radically different society emerges, one that seems - at first - to be suddenly, blissfully safer than what came before. And then The Men appears online: uncanny video footage that shows the missing being herded through bizarre, otherworldly landscapes. Is it a hoax, or could The Men hold the key to bringing back those who were lost? And if so, what might be the cost?From the author of The Heavens, The Men is a gripping, beautiful, and disquieting novel of impossible sacrifices that asks: what might we be prepared to give up to create a better world?

  • by Frans de Waal
    £18.49

    A ground-breaking look at gender and sex from the world's leading primatologist and New York Times bestselling author of ARE WE SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW HOW SMART ANIMALS ARE?'Brilliant and fascinating... brings a scientific, compassionate and balanced approach to some of the hottest controversies about sex and gender' Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens, Homo Deus and 21 Lessons for the 21st CenturyHow different are the sexes? Is gender uniquely human? Where does gender identity originate?Drawing on decades of observing our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, world-renowned primatologist Frans de Waal explores what we know of biological sex differences and of the role of culture and socialization.From maternal and paternal behaviour to sexual orientation, gender identity, and the limitations of the gender binary, de Waal analyses our shared evolutionary history with the apes, considering what is similar and what sets us apart. Male and female networking groups, sexual signals, the existence of gender non-conforming individuals, and maternal bonds are observed in primate societies, but humans stand apart in the development of nuclear families, the prevalence of sexual violence, and joint parental care.With expert insight and engaging storytelling, de Waal not only sets right gendered biases in the scientific community, but delivers a fresh and thought-provoking understanding of the behavioural norms and the many remarkable potentials of the human species.'A breath of fresh air...Fascinating, nuanced and very timely' Rutger Bregman, author of Humankind and Utopia for Realists

  • by Jack Parlett
    £15.49

    Fire Island: a slim strip of land off the coast of New York, and a place of hedonism, reinvention, liberation.Arriving on the island after a break-up back home in England, scholar and poet Jack Parlett was beguiled by what he found. Here were the halcyon scenes of Frank O'Hara's poetry; the bars where Patricia Highsmith got drunk; the infamous cruising sites; and the dazzling beaches where couples had fallen in and out of love, free for a sun-kissed moment to be themselves in the time before gay liberation.Tracing Fire Island's rich history, Parlett leads the reader through the early days of the island's life as a discreet home for same-sex love, to the wild parties of the post-Stonewall disco era, to the residents' confrontation with the AIDS epidemic, and into a present where a host of new challenges threaten the island's future.Lyrical and vivid, Fire Island is a hymn to an iconic destination, and to the men and women whose ardour and determination spread freedom across its shores.

  • by Rebecca Rukeyser
    £11.99

    An electrifying debut novel about a young woman and her desire for sleaze, whose idyllic summer on a remote Alaskan homestead takes a disturbing turn."e;Sexy and dark and strange and absolutely perfect."e;Carmen Maria Machado"e;Puppy love meets jaded lust to dance their death spiral insidea young woman's head ... I ate it up."e;Nell ZinkTourists arrive all summer, by boat or seaplane, at Stu and Maureen Jenkins's Lavender Island Wilderness Lodge in the Kodiak Archipelago, expecting adventure. But the spontaneity of their authentic Alaskan wilderness experience is meticulously scripted, except when real danger rears its head. Stu and Maureen's lodge is failing, as is their marriage. Mira has been hired for the season as the lodge's baker and housekeeper. But she's also busy gleefully nursing twin obsessions: building a working theory of what constitutes 'sleaze' and pursuing a young fisherman she deems the embodiment of all things deliciously sleazy. Her plans become more perverse and elaborate, even as life on Lavender Island starts to unravel.By midseason, it becomes clear that Stu, the jovial, predatory patriarch of the lodge, has turned his sexual attentions to another young employee. As the mood of the lodge spirals into chaos, the inhabitants realize just how isolated Lavender Island really is.Hilarious, sensual, and charged with menace, The Seaplane on Final Approach brilliantly illuminates the mirage-thin line between the artificial and the feral. In this daring and psychologically razor-sharp debut, Rukeyser's characters tear aside the facade of good manners to reveal all of our deepest needs and naked desires.

  • by Margo Jefferson
    £15.49

    Taking in the jazz and blues icons whom Jefferson idolised as a child in the 1950s, ideas of what the female body could be - as incarnated by trailblazing Black dancers and athletes - Harriet Beecher Stowe's Topsy reimagined in the artworks of Kara Walker, white supremacy in the novels of Willa Cather, and more, this breathtakingly eloquent account is both a critique and a vindication of the constructed self.

  • by Jules Montague
    £17.49

    As featured on BBC Radio 4 (Woman's Hour, Start the Week), Times Radio, in the Telegraph (also as a bestseller), The Times, and at the Royal Institution.A diagnosis is supposed to give us certainty, our first step on the road to recovery.But what if your diagnosis is inflected by a doctor's bias, swayed by Big Pharma, or designed to protect the police? What happens when you are -- or your child is -- refused a diagnosis for a condition the establishment will not recognise?As a consultant neurologist, Dr Jules Montague saw the relief a diagnosis could bring, but she also came to see its limitations. In this eye-opening and humane account, Montague meets with the patients and families who have had their lives turned upside down by a diagnosis they never deserved.She speaks to parents fighting for recognition of their children's symptoms; men and women whose bodies have been stigmatised by society; and to the families of young black men who are being diagnosed posthumously with a condition that could exonerate their killers.Through these stories of heartbreak and resilience, Montague shines a light on the troubled state of diagnosis, and asks how we might begin to heal.

  • by Amy Bloom
    £15.49

    In January 2020, Amy Bloom travelled with her husband Brian to Switzerland, where he was helped by Dignitas to end his life while Amy sat with him and held his hand. Brian was terminally ill and for the last year of his life Amy had struggled to find a way to support his wish to take control of his death, to not submerge 'into the darkness of an expiring existence'. Written with piercing insight and wit, In Love is Bloom's intimate, authentic and startling account of losing Brian, first slowly to the disease of Alzheimer's, and then on becoming a widow. It charts the anxiety and pain of the process that led them to Dignitas, while never avoiding the complex ethical problems that are raised by assisted death. A poignant love letter to Bloom's husband and a passionate outpouring of grief, In Love reaffirms the power and value of human relationships.

  • by Charlotte McDonald-Gibson
    £17.49

    What makes an extremist? From obscure cults to revolutionary movements, people have always been seduced by fringe beliefs. And in today's deeply divided world, more people than ever are drawn to polarising ideologies. All too often we simply condemn those whose positions offend us, instead of trying to understand what draws people to the far edges of society -- and what can pull them back again.In Far Out, we meet eight people from across religious, ideological, and national divides who found themselves drawn to radical beliefs, including a young man who became the face of white supremacy in Trump-era America, a Norwegian woman sucked into a revolutionary conspiracy in the 1980s, a schoolboy who left Britain to fight in Syria, and an Australian from the far-left Antifa movement.By immersing us in their stories, McDonald-Gibson challenges our ideas of who or what an extremist is, and shows us not only what we can do to prevent extremism in the future, but how we can start healing the rifts in our world today.

  • by Alejandro Zambra
    £15.49

    Gonzalo is a frustrated would-be poet in a city full of poets; poets lurk in every bookshop, prop up every bar, ready to debate the merits of Teillier and Millan (but never Neruda - beyond the pale). Then, nine years after their bewildering breakup, Gonzalo reunites with his teen sweetheart, Carla, who is now, to his surprise, the mother of a young son, Vicente. Soon they form a happy sort-of family - a stepfamily, though no such word exists in their language.In time, fate and ambition pull the lovers apart, but when it comes to love and poetry, what will be Gonzalo's legacy to his not-quite-stepson Vicente? Zambra chronicles with tenderness and insight the everyday moments - absurd, painful, sexy, sweet, profound - that constitute family life in this bold and brilliant new novel.

  • by Caroline Albertine Minor
    £11.99

    Over the decades since their parents died, siblings Sidsel, Ea and Niels have drifted apart, retreating in order to protect their most vulnerable parts. But single mother Sidsel's last-minute work trip to London, site of past transgressions, and Ea's chance visit to a San Francisco clairvoyant - seeking contact with their late mother - force the trio to reckon with their shared history and complicated inheritance.

  • by Siri Helle
    £11.99

    Humans have always used their hands to create the world around them. But now most of us have gone from being practitioners to theorists, from being producers to consumers. What happens to our society when we are so divorced from the act of making? What happens to us as individuals when we limit the uses to which we put our hands? These are questions that preoccupy Siri Helle when she inherits a cabin of 25 square metres, without electricity, inlet water, or a loo, and decides to build an outhouse herself. Without any previous experience of building anything, she has to learn on the job and what she learns is not just about how to lay a floor and construct walls, but about what she is capable of and about craft and about the satisfactions to be found in making things by hand. Written with humour and insight, Handmade is the inspiring story of someone who tried to do it herself - and did.

  • by Irene Solà
    £11.99

    When Domenec - mountain-dweller, father, poet, dreamer - dies suddenly, struck by lightning, he leaves behind two small children, Mia and Hilari, to grow up wild among the looming summits of the Pyrenees and the ghosts of the Spanish civil war.But then Hilari dies too, and his sister is forced to face life's struggles and joys alone. As the years tumble by, the inhabitants of the mountain - human, animal and other - come together in a chorus of voices to bear witness to the sorrows of one family, and to the savage beauty of the landscape. This remarkable English-language debut is lyrical, mythical, elemental, and ferociously imaginative.

  • by Tom de Freston
    £15.49

    Artist Tom de Freston has long had an obsession with G,ricault's painting The Raft of the Medusa, and the troubling story behind its creation. The monumental canvas, which hangs in the Louvre, depicts a 19th century tragedy in which 150 people were drowned at sea on a raft lost in a stormy sea, when the ship Medusa was wrecked on shallow ground. When de Freston began making an artwork with Ali, a Syrian writer blinded by a bombing, The Raft's depiction of pain and suffering resonated powerfully with him, as did G,ricault's awful life story. It spoke not only to Ali's story but to Tom's family history of trauma and anguish, offering him a passage out of the dark waters in which he found himself. In spellbinding, visceral prose, de Freston opens a window onto the magnetic frisson that runs between a past masterpiece and contemporary artistic endeavours. He asks powerful questions about how we might translate violence, fear and trauma into art, how we try to make sense of seemingly unthinkable acts, and the value in facing and depicting the darkest horrors.

Join thousands of book lovers

Sign up to our newsletter and receive discounts and inspiration for your next reading experience.