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  • - Hidden Detail in Harry Clarke's Stained Glass
    by Lucy Costigan
    £10.49

    Dark Beauty focuses on the minute detail in Harry Clarke's stained-glass windows, particularly in the borders and lower panels of his work. Clarke's brilliance as a graphic artist is clearly visible in his book illustrations, which are imbued with precise attention to intricate designs, and he applied the same lavish focus to every facet of his stained glass. The title 'Dark Beauty' refers to the duality of Clarke's work that sees delicate angels juxtaposed with macabre, grotesque figures, and represents the partially hidden details that dwell in the background of his windows - motifs, accessories, flora, fauna and diminutive characters - which may be missed in light of the dominance of the central subjects. The authors spent many years photographing Clarke's windows in Ireland, England, America and Australia, and the resulting 60,000 photos have been carefully whittled down to 500 glorious images. Dark Beauty will provide lovers of Clarke's stained glass with the opportunity to view previously obscured or unnoticed details in all their unique beauty and inspire their own travels to view Clarke's work.

  • - A Centenary Assessment
    by Eugenio Biagini
    £3.49

    Originally published in 1960 and edited by Conor Cruise O'Brien, The Shaping of Modern Ireland was a seminal work surveying the lives of prominent early twentieth-century figures who influenced Irish affairs in the years between the death of Charles Stewart Parnell in 1891 and the Easter Rising of 1916. The chapters were written by leading historians and commentators from the Ireland of the 1950s, some of whom personally knew the subjects of their essays.This volume draws its inspiration from that seminal work. Written by some of today's leading figures from the world of Irish history, politics, journalism and the arts, it revisits a crucial phase in the country's history, one that culminated in the Easter Rising and the Revolution, when everything 'changed utterly'. With chapters on men and women of the stature of Carson, Connolly and Markievicz, but also industrialists such as Guinness who contributed to 'shaping modern Ireland' in the social and economic sphere, this book offers an important contribution to the renewal of the debate on the country's history.

  • - In Modern Ireland and Revolution, leading Irish historians deliver critical essays that consider the life, writing and monumental influence of Ernie O'Malley, and the modern art that influenced him.
    by Cormac O'Malley
    £3.49

    In 1922, following a decade of political ferment and much bloodshed, the Irish Free State was established, became stabilised, and developed along conservative lines. During these years the prevailing impulse was to reprove the actions of republicans who had rejected the Anglo-Irish Treaty, and many significant revolutionary voices were left unheeded. One mind, more agile than most of his contemporaries, belonged to Ernie O'Malley. It was through his vastly popular 'clipped lyric' memoirs, especially On Another Man's Wound in 1936, that many of the complexities of the republican mindset were brought to light for readers worldwide.In Modern Ireland and Revolution, leading Irish and American historians and academics deliver critical essays that consider the life, writings and monumental influence of Ernie O'Malley, and the modern arts that influenced him. After his involvement in the War of Independence and the Civil War, O'Malley developed a modernist approach while living abroad for ten years; he was devoted to the arts, moved in circles that included Georgia O'Keeffe and Paul Strand, and through his probing mind counteracted any notion that republicans of his era were dull, inflexible idealists. In this fascinating collection, art and revolution coincide, enriching every preconception of the minds that supported both sides of the Treaty, and revealing untoward truths about the Irish Free State's process of remembrance.

  • by Linda Connolly
    £8.49

    The narrative of the Irish revolution as a chronology of great men and male militarism, with women presumed to have either played a subsidiary role or no role at all, requires reconsideration. Women and feminists were extremely active in Irish revolutionary causes from 1912 onwards, but ultimately it was the men as revolutionary 'leaders' who took all the power, and indeed all the credit, after independence. Women from different backgrounds were activists in significant numbers and women across Ireland were profoundly impacted by the overall violence and tumult of the era, but they were then relegated to the private sphere, with the memory of their vital political and military role in the revolution forgotten and erased.Women and the Irish Revolution examines diverse aspects of women's experiences in the revolution after the Easter Rising. The complex role of women as activists, the detrimental impact of violence and social and political divisions on women, the role of women in the foundation of the new State, and dynamics of remembrance and forgetting are explored in detail by leading scholars in sociology, history, politics, and literary studies. Important and timely, and featuring previously unpublished material, this book will prompt essential new public conversations on the experiences of women in the Irish revolution.

  • - The Kennedy Legacy, Ireland and America
    by Brian Murphy
    £9.49

    Elected in 1960 as the 35th President of the USA, John Fitzgerald Kennedy remains to this day the office's youngest incumbent and he was its first Roman Catholic. His term in office was short, but arguably no US President has inspired more people around the globe than JFK. Even today, for generations born decades after his death, President Kennedy's legacy has an enduring appeal. This insightful book contains specially commissioned pieces by a range of respected academic and political figures, including former Obama speechwriter, Cody Kennan, the President of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights organisation, Kerry Kennedy, and former senior adviser to Bernie Sanders, Tad Devine. With the presidency of Joe Biden seeing a renewed focus on broader themes within Irish, American and global politics, From Whence I Came is a fascinating and timely collection that offers a fresh perspective on the Kennedy legacy and the politics of Ireland and the United States.

  • - 1913-1915: Recollections and Documents
    by F.X. Martin
    £11.49 - 22.49

    Originally edited by F.X. Martin in 1963, this is the 50th anniversary edition of the classic work on the Irish Volunteers. This book is a wonderful and unique historical record of the Irish Volunteer movement, revealing fascinating documents and essays written by the leading members of Irish nationalism, during a period when the Irish people witnessed social and cultural changes that were as radical as anything seen in Irish history. Including contributions by Bulmer Hobson, Eoin MacNeill, Padraig Pearse, Michael Davitt, The O'Rahilly, Eamonn Ceannt, and Sean T. O Ceallaigh, this a rich compendium of essays, original letters, first hand reports, inspiring speeches, newspaper editorials, military and administrative instructions as well as members' subscription lists. This classic text explains how the Irish Volunteers, encompassing a new generation of Irish men and women, oversaw the develop ment of a new and re- energized movement, free from much of the party-political machinations and interference that had hindered Irish nationalist attempts at self-determination in previous decades. As described in these essays, the Irish Volunteers were a 'broad church' encompassing members of the Gaelic League, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, Sinn Fein, the IRB, Irish Citizen Army, Cumann na mBan and Fianna Eireann, all contributing to a unified and dynamic coalition. Something new and unprecedented occurred in Irish history - a movement which we are only now beginning to understand in terms of its great and distinctive legacy, a full century later.

  • - Nationalist and Internationalist
    by Bryce Evans
    £2.99

    Revolutionary; statesman; polymath: Frank Aiken cuts a colossal figure in twentieth century Irish history. However, he remains a controversial figure-regarded as a war criminal by some and a principled proponent of National liberation by others.In this engaging biographical collection, contributors scrutinise Aiken's thoughts and actions at several critical junctures in modern Irish and world history, taking readers through the War of Independence, Civil War, the birth of the new state, the Second World War, the Cold War and the modern Northern Ireland Troubles. Divided into two sections - Nationalist and Internationalist - and based on an unrivalled breadth of testimony from academics, family members, rivals and colleagues, this study ultimately details the footprints Aiken left on the national and international political stageAiken owed his early eminence to military rather than political leadership; he was commandant of the 4th Northern Division of the IRA during the War of Independence and was driven to undertake the most daring and spectacular feats of the Irish Civil War. He went on to become the Chief of Staff of the Anti-Treaty IRA but was expelled for backing de Valera's plan for a Republican government - the beginnings of Fianna Fil. Thereafter his instrumental role was to be political: a Minister for Defence, Finance, and External Affairs over the course of the following decades; he was to oversee much success and controversy in the burgeoning state. This biography represents the first deserving assessment of a monumental personality in 20th century Irish History.

  • - New Perspectives on Class War & its Legacy
    by Conor Mcnamara
    £3.49

    Putting Ireland on trial, Jim Larkin's verdict was damning and resolute. His words resound, shuddering towards the present day where class division and workers' rights disputes make headlines with swelling frequency. In this pioneering collection, an exemplary list of contributors registers the radical momentum within Dublin in 1913, its effects internationally, and its paramount example in shaping political activism within Ireland to this day.The narrative of the beleaguered yet dignified workers who stood up to the greed of their Irish masters is examined, revealing the truths that were too fraught with trauma, shame and political tension to remain within popular memory. Beyond the animosity and immediate impact of the industrial dispute are its enduring lessons through the First World War, the Easter Rising, and the birth of the Irish Free State; its legacy, real and adopted, instructs the surge of activism currently witnessed, but to what effect?The Dublin Lockout, 1913 illuminates this pivotal class war in Irish history: inspiring, shocking, and the nearest thing Ireland had to a debate on the type of society that was wanted by its citizens.

  • - Becoming Citizens, New Edition
    by Louise Ryan
    £3.49

    This landmark book, reissued with a new foreword to mark the centenary of Irish women being granted the right to vote, is the first comprehensive analysis of the Irish suffrage movement from its mid-nineteenth-century beginnings to when feminist militancy exploded on the streets of Dublin and Belfast in the early twentieth century. Younger, more militant suffragists took their cue from their British counterparts, two of whom travelled to Ireland to throw a hatchet into the carriage of Prime Minister Herbert Asquith on O'Connell Bridge in 1912 (missing him but grazing Home Rule leader John Redmond, who was in the same carriage; both politicians opposed giving women the Vote).Despite such dramatic publicity, and other non-violent campaigning, women's suffrage was a minority interest in an Ireland more concerned with the issue of gaining independence from Britain. The particular complexity of the Irish struggle is explored with new perspectives on unionist and nationalist suffragists and the conflict between Home Rule and suffragism, campaigning for the vote in country towns, life in industrial Belfast, conflicting feminist views on the First World War, and the suffragist uncovering of sexual abuse and domestic violence, as well as the pioneering use of hunger strike as a political tool.The ultimate granting of the franchise in 1918 represented the end of a long-fought battle by Irish women for the right to equal citizenship, and the beginning of a new Ireland that continues to debate the rights and equality of its female citizens.

  • - Debating and Establishing the Irish State
    by Liam Weeks
    £6.49

    What exactly did the split over the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 actually mean? We know it both established the independent Irish state and that Ireland would not be a fully sovereign republic and provided for the partition of Northern Ireland. The Treaty was ratified 64 votes to 57 by the Sinn Fein members of the Revolutionary Dail Eireann, splitting Sinn Fein irrevocably and leading to the Irish Civil War, a rupture that still defines the Irish political landscape a century on. Drawing together the work of a diverse range of scholars, who each re-examine this critical period in Irish political history from a variety of perspectives, The Anglo-Irish Treaty Debates addresses this vexed historical and political question for a new generation of readers in the ongoing Decade of Commemorations, to determine what caused the split and its consequences that are still felt today.

  • - Reflections on Twenty-Five Years of Irish America and New York University's Glucksman Ireland House
    by Terry Golway
    £2.99

    New York University's Glucksman Ireland House opened a quarter-century ago to foster the study of Ireland and Irish America, and since then has led and witnessed tremendous changes in Irish and Irish-American culture. Alice McDermott writes about her son's Irish awakening; Colum McCann's Joycean essay is a brilliant call to action in defence of immigrants and social justice; Colm Toibin's first visit to New York coincided with the first St Patrick's Day parade led by a woman; Dan Barry reflects on Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes; and a new poem by Seamus Heaney written not long before his death. Through deeply personal essays that reflect on their own experience, research and art, some of the best-known Irish writers on both sides of the Atlantic commemorate the House's anniversary by examining what has changed, and what has not, in Irish and Irish-American culture, art, identity, and politics since 1993.

  • by Okan Ozseker
    £8.49

    Donegal was the bastion of Home Rule conservative nationalism during the tumultuous period 1911-25, while County Derry was a stronghold of hard-line unionism. In this time of immense political upheaval between these cultural and social majorities lay the deeply symbolic, religiously and ethnically divided, and potentially combustible, Derry City.What had once been a distinct, unified, socio-economic and cultural area (to nationalists and unionists alike) became an international frontier or borderland, overshadowed by the bitter legacy of Partition. The region was the hardest hit by the implementation of Partition, affecting all levels of society.This completely new interpretation of the history of the Irish north-west provides a fair and balanced portrait of a divided borderland and addresses key arguments in Irish history and the history of revolution, counter-revolution, feuds and state-building.Ambitious and novel in its approach, Forging the Border: Donegal and Derry in Times of Revolution, 1911-1925 fills an important lacuna, and challenges long-held assumptions and beliefs about the road to partition in the north-west.

  • - Celebrating Benedict Kiely
    by George O'Brien
    £9.49

    Novelist, short-story writer, critic, memoirist, broadcaster and journalist: Benedict Kiely (1919-2007) was not only one of the best known but one of the most artistically and culturally distinctive men of letters of his day. His fascination with the island of Ireland, the myths and memories of its people, and the many-voiced quality of its traditions, has secured for him a unique place in the country's literary history.His substantial body of fiction and non-fiction is a repository of lore and learning, and amply rewards not only the interest shown in it over many years by his popularity among the general public, but also that of Irish and international literary scholarship.Strangely, however, despite his renowned reputation and canonical status, Kiely remains a writer whose work has generated surprisingly little secondary literature, academic or otherwise. This charming collection of twelve essays by some of Ireland's foremost writers and esteemed international critics, in this, his centenary year, will breathe new life into Kiely's work and place him back where he belongs, at the heart of Irish literature.

  • - Soldiers, New Women and Wicked Hags
    by Louise Ryan
    £8.49

    Studies of Irish nationalism have been primarily historical in scope and overwhelmingly male in content. Too often, the 'shadow of the gunman' has dominated. Little recognition has been given to the part women have played, yet over the centuries they have undertaken a variety of roles - as combatants, prisoners, writers and politicians. In this exciting new book the full range of women's contribution to the Irish nationalist movement is explored by writers whose interests range from the historical and sociological to the literary and cultural. From the little known contribution of women to the earliest nationalist uprisings of the 1600s and 1700s, to their active participation in the republican campaigns of the twentieth century, different chapters consider the changing contexts of female militancy and the challenge this has posed to masculine images and structures.Using a wide range of sources, including textual analysis, archives and documents, newspapers and autobiographies, interviews and action research, individual writers examine sensitive and highly complex debates around women's role in situations of conflict.At the cutting edge of contemporary scholarship, this is a major contribution to wider feminist debates about the gendering of nationalism, raising questions about the extent to which women's rights, demands and concerns can ever be fully accommodated within nationalist movements.

  • - Essays in Philosophy of Religion in Honour of Patrick Masterson
    by Fran O'Rourke
    £9.49

    The title Ciphers of Transcendence reflects the philosophical interests of Patrick Masterson, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy of Religion, University College Dublin. Transcendence is a millefeuille term conveying layered and diverse nuances, from the first openness of human awareness towards the outside world, to the ultimate affirmation of and commitment to a loving and infinite Transcendent. Patrick Masterson has devoted his philosophical career to reflection upon the unfathomable nature of the latter, seeking to decipher instances and images of transcendence within the realm of limited human experience. Through teaching and writing he has shared with students and readers his deeply personal reflections on questions of primal importance. Patrick Masterson's colleagues and students - all devoted friends - here offer, in return, their diverse perspectives.The essays deal in one way or another with transcendence, examined in dialogue with a roll call of thinkers across the ages, from ancient authors to medieval masters, modern giants to recent luminaries. The volume is enhanced by the inclusion of an essay by leading contemporary thinker Alasdair MacIntyre, and a poem from Seamus Heaney that evokes across the silence of solitude the tender presence of transcendence.

  • - Ernie O'Malley's Interviews with the Northern Divisions
    by Siobhra Aiken
    £3.49

    The Men Will Talk to Me is a collection of interviews conducted and recorded by famed Irish republican revolutionary Ernie O'Malley during the 1940s and 1950s. The interviews were carried out with survivors of the four Northern Divisions of the IRA, chief among them Frank Aiken, Peadar O'Donnell and Paddy McLogan, who offer fascinating insights into Ulster's centrality in the War of Independence and the slide towards Civil War. The title refers to the implicit trust that shadows these interviews, earned through Ernie O'Malley's reputation as a fearsome military commander in the revolutionary movement - the veterans interviewed divulge details to O'Malley which they wouldn't have disclosed to even their closest family members. Startlingly direct, the issues covered include the mobilization of the Dundalk Volunteers for the 1916 Rising, the events of Bloody Sunday (1920), the Belfast Pogroms, and the planning of historical escapes from the Curragh and Kilkenny Gaol. The Men Will Talk to Me is an insightful and painstaking reflection of the horror of the Irish War of Independence and Civil War; in words resolute and faltering, the physical and psychological debts of the revolutionary mindset - those of hardened Pro- and Anti-Treaty veterans - are fiercely apparent.

  • - The Berlin Diary of Roger Casement 1914-1916
    by Angus Mitchell
    £2.99

    One Bold Deed of Open Treason describes the astonishing journey by Roger Casement to Germany in 1914, via New York and Norway. Arriving into Berlin under a false identity, Casement entered a space of conspiracy and subterfuge. Through his vivid and gripping diary entries, a picture emerges of a man caught in the crossfire of international events and spiralling towards a tragic denouement.In recording his daily thoughts, emotions and movements, Casement chronicles his despair at the conflict he witnessed, his hopeless mission to raise an Irish brigade and his attempts to promote the cause of Ireland in an escalating world crisis. With an expert editorial hand, Angus Mitchell provides clear context to Casement's diaries, revealing his gruelling visit to the Western Front, the shocking interplay between the Easter Rising and the international theatre of the First World War, and the grand, sacrificial conclusion of his life.

  • by Grainne Healy
    £2.99

    At 7.20pm on 23rd May 2015, in the courtyard of Dublin Castle, Ireland truly became a nation of equals. Ireland Says Yes is the fast-paced narrative account of all the drama, excitement and highs and lows of the last 100 days of the extraordinary campaign for a Yes vote in the 2015 Marriage Equality Referendum.Those who led the Yes Equality campaign tell the inside story of how the referendum was won, and how Ireland's two principal gay and lesbian rights organisations put together the most effective and successful civic society campaign ever launched in Irish politics.As well as a drama-packed chronological account of how the Yes campaign was executed, the book explores how social media mobilised a new generation of voters to the polls and how political parties, student unions and youth groups co-ordinated their efforts to deliver one of the most historic referendum results in Irish political history.

  • by Siobhra Aiken
    £10.49

    This book challenges the widespread scholarly and popular belief that the Irish Civil War (1922-1923) was followed by a 'traumatic silence'. It achieves this by opening an alternative archive of published testimonies which were largely produced in the 1920s and 1930s; testimonies were written by pro- and anti-treaty men and women, in both English and Irish. Nearly all have eluded sustained scholarly attention to date. However, the act of smuggling private, painful experience into the public realm, especially when it challenged official memory making (or even forgetting), demanded the cautious deployment of self-protective narrative strategies. As a result, many testimonies from the Irish Civil War emerge in non-conventional, hybridised and fictionalised forms of life writing. This book re-introduces a number of these testimonies into public debate. It considers contemporary understandings of mental illness and how a number of veterans - both men and women - self-consciously engaged in projects of therapeutic writing as a means to 'heal' the 'spiritual wounds' of civil war. It also outlines the prevalence of literary representations of revolutionary sexual violence, challenging the assumptions that sexual violence during the Irish revolution was either 'rare' or 'hidden'.

  • by Harry F. Martin
    £9.49

  • by Dan Harvey
    £8.49

    The Battle of Britain, regarded by historians as one of the greatest air battles in the history of warfare, was an early turning point in the Second World War. In the summer of 1940, the German army had, with astonishing speed, mercilessly swept aside all before them and were perched on the northern coastline of France. Outright victory over all of Europe was impeded only by the expanse of the English Channel. The supremely confident, yet-to-be defeated Luftwaffe (German Air Force) were eager for continued action, to claim air superiority and victory over an outnumbered RAF and clear the skies for the amphibious invasions of Britain and Ireland. It was vital that the RAF deny them, and so a ferocious and highly strategic aerial battle began that was to rage for more than three months. Among those in the RAF's Spitfire and Hurricane fighter squadrons were Irishmen, who were in the thick of the aerial exchanges, daring 'dog-fights', and intrepid interceptions of German bombers. A Bloody Summer: The Irish at the Battle of Britain for the first time tells the true and full story of their heretofore underestimated involvement in this epic aerial encounter.

  • by Homan Potterton
    £7.49

    Ireland in the mid-twentieth century, and Julia and Lydia Esdaile live with their widowed father, Willis, at Knockfane, a country house and farm where the Protestant Esdaile family have lived for centuries. When Willis inexplicably banishes his only son and heir, Edward, he concocts a complex plan to protect and preserve Knockfane for succeeding generations. But time passes, and Willis dies, and soon his intentions are threatened and thwarted by unforeseen events. Ultimately, it must fall to his daughters - the headstrong, confident Julia and the quiet, reflective Lydia - to protect the Knockfane legacy. Suffused with gentle lyricism, this is an enthralling, elegant drama that explores the complexities of family, inheritance and legacy against the backdrop of the Ireland of its time, steeped in the conventions, customs, and deep-seated suspicions which governed both Protestants and Catholics in a rapidly changing society following Irish independence. Knockfane is a Big House novel for a new generation.

  • by Gearoid O Faolean
    £8.49

    This groundbreaking book is the first to detail, with startling new revelations, just how integral the Republic of Ireland was to the Provisional IRA's campaign at every level. The sheer level of sympathy and support that existed for militant republicanism in Southern Irish society demonstrates that the longevity of the 'Troubles' was due in large part to this widespread tolerance and aid. No Irish political party was without members who aided the Provisional IRA in their early years of their campaign, as former IRA volunteers attest to in interviews and previously unpublished accounts of training camps in the Republic. Juried courts for IRA suspects were phased out as both juries and judges were regularly acquitting republicans in cases of blatant IRA activity, and juries often celebrated with or congratulated the defendants: in discussion with the British government Taoiseach Jack Lynch even named judges who were deemed overly sympathetic to the IRA. The extent of activity, training, financing, armed robberies, demonstrations and goodwill for the IRA in the Irish Republic is rarely if ever acknowledged in Irish mainstream media or the education curriculum. A Broad Church: The Provisional IRA in the Republic of Ireland, 1969-1980 will dramatically change that view forever.

  • by Sam Coulter-Smith
    £10.49

    For over 275 years, the Rotunda Hospital has been at the forefront of maternity services in Ireland. In Delivering the Future: Reflections of a Rotunda Master, Sam Coulter-Smith celebrates the history of the hospital, with a particular focus on the last thirty years, and explains why voluntary hospitals, with their ability to lead, adapt, research, and provide the best clinical services to their patients, play a vital role in maintaining and improving standards in our health service. Along with personal stories from a professional life that has revolved around the Rotunda, Prof. Coulter-Smith explores the recent developments in the Irish hospital service, particularly on the back of the Covid-19 pandemic, and how the independence of Ireland's surviving voluntary hospitals is being stealthily eroded by current government policy and HSE controls, to the detriment of the entire health service. He also examines what we can learn from how our health service has been managed in the past and questions how we can use this learning to plan for a better future.

  • by Jeffrey Leddin
    £9.49

    The Irish Citizen Army (ICA) was born from the Dublin Lockout of 1913, when industrialist William Martin Murphy 'locked out' workers who refused to resign from the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union, sparking one of the most dramatic industrial disputes in Irish history. Faced with threats of police brutality in response to the strike, James Connolly, James Larkin and Jack White established the ICA in the winter of 1913.By the end of March 1914, the ICA espoused republican ideology and that the ownership of Ireland was 'vested of right in the people of Ireland'. The ICA was in the process of being totally transformed, going on to provide significant support to the IRA during the 1916 Rising.Despite Connolly's execution and the internment of many ICA members, the ICA reorganised in 1917, subsequently developing networks for arms importation and 'intelligence', and later providing operative support for the War of Independence in Dublin.The most extensive survey of the movement to date, The 'Labour Hercules' explores the ICA's evolution into a republican army and its legacy to the present day.

  • by Micheal O Fathartaigh
    £9.49

  • by Micheal Smith
    £10.49

    In UDR: Declassified, Micheal Smith reveals what the British establishment, the British government and its armed forces knew and had to say about the regiment in recently declassified files. From its formation in 1970 as a locally raised militia, the Ulster Defence Regiment developed into the largest regiment in the British Army. For unionists, service in the UDR was a noble act and often a family tradition; for nationalists, an encounter with the UDR was frequently hostile, often brutal, and sometimes fatal. To the British Army, they were 'a dangerous species of ally', and a classic militia regiment which was part of a long tradition of the use of such forces by the British Empire. It was viewed as 'a safety valve' for the tempers of loyalist extremism, and it also served as the main source of training, weaponry, and intelligence files for loyalists throughout the conflict. UDR: Declassified is an evidence-based expose of the UDR through the declassified files of Number 10, the MoD, and the NIO. The denial of access to history is a part of a continuum of British state efforts to obscure its colonial past. This book is a testimony to the value of defying such efforts and uncovering the truths behind our traumatic past.

  • by Eugene Broderick
    £10.49

    Thomas Meagher is the biography of the father of one of Ireland's most famous patriots, Thomas Francis Meagher. Overshadowed by his son, he was a man of deeply held political and religious principles, who, through his philanthropic works and political career, helped shape the character of nineteenth-century Ireland and deserves to be remembered in his own right. The book charts the complete story of Meagher, from his birth to Irish parents in Newfoundland, to his death in Bray in 1874. Most of his life was spent in Waterford city and it was there that he would establish himself as champion of political and religious equality, holding mayoral and parliamentary offices, while also working for the alleviation of suffering for the working classes, particularly during the Great Famine. A staunch follower of Daniel O'Connell, his career was strongly linked to the ongoing fight for repeal and Catholic rights. Broderick also looks at the fascinating and complex relationship Meagher had with his son, Thomas Francis, which mirrored the age-old conflict between constitutional and revolutionary nationalism in Ireland. Illuminating the history, not only of the man, but also the times in which he lived, this is a very human story set against the backdrop of great political turbulence.

  • by Eve Morrison
    £10.49

    The Kilmichael Ambush of 28 November 1920 was and remains one of the most famous, successful - and uniquely controversial - IRA attacks of the Irish War of Independence. This book is the first comprehensive account of both the ambush and the intense debates that followed. It explores the events, memory and historiography of the ambush, from 1920 to the present day, within a wider framework of interwar European events, global 'memory wars' and current scholarship relating to Irish, British, oral and military history. Kilmichael: The Life and Afterlife of an Ambush features extensive archival research, including the late Peter Hart's papers, as well as many other new sources from British and Irish archives, and previously unavailable oral history interviews with Kilmichael veterans. There has always been more than one version of Kilmichael. Tom Barry's account certainly became the dominant one after the publication of Guerilla Days in Ireland in 1949, but it was always shadowed and contested by others, and in this book, Eve Morrison meticulously reconstructs both 'British' and 'Irish' perspectives on this momentous and much-debated attack.

  • by Homan Potterton
    £7.49

    Set in 1950s rural Ireland, Rathcormick is the engaging and beautifully written tale of a large and happy Protestant farming family: a stern and domineering Papa, a warm and practical Mama, their two daughters and six sons. For Homan, the youngest, life is a free-spirited awakening in a world of old-fashioned virtue and frugality. But no boyhood lasts forever, and an abrupt turn of events signals an end to the idyll. Exploring the values and mores of an almost lost part of Irish society Rathcormick is an unforgettable memoir: funny, compelling and original.

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