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  • by Alexandre Dumas
    £8.49

    Edmond Dantes, an innocent young sailor, falls into despair when he is arrested on a false charge of treason and thrown into prison without a trial. He learns of his friends' betrayal from the Abbe Faria, an equally innocent prisoner, and plots his revenge following a daring, if nightmarish escape from the Chateau d'If. After becoming a wealthy man, he assumes the guise of the urbane Count of Monte-Cristo and begins to entrap his enemies one by one. However, a chilling realization finally dawns - that he is also harming those he loves. 1. HAPPINESS DASHED. Edmond Dantes returns to Marseilles in 1815 as the new captain of the Pharaon. On shore, Monsieur Morrel, the ship's owner, is informed by Danglars, the ship's mate, that Dantes has taken a package to Napoleon, exiled in Elba. Dantes visits his father, in debt to Caderousse, a neighbour, before hastening to see Mercedes, his fiancee. At her village, she rebuffs Fernand, her fellow Catalan, but embraces Dantes. Later Fernand joins Caderousse and Danglars, who plot to eliminate Dantes. The engaged couple host a pre-wedding feast which ends in Dantes' arrest. 2. ROUGH JUSTICE. At the Palais de Justice, Villefort, a prosecutor, is struck by the similarity of his and Dantes' situation, being himself about to marry. He realizes that Dantes is a political innocent and decides to free him. However, he discovers the existence of an incriminating letter addressed to Noirtier, his father, which Dantes is carrying. Stunned, Villefort orders his immediate incarceration in the island prison of Chateau d'If. Years pass by as Dantes remains isolated in a dungeon. In the world outside Villefort climbs the legal ladder, Mercedes is grief-stricken but marries Fernand, and old Dantes dies. Six years later, Dantes hears another prisoner and starts to dig towards him. The Abbe Faria, a reputedly mad inmate, finally breaks through into his cell. 3. A LEARNED ITALIAN. Faria listens to Dantes' story and helps him to understand how and why he has been 'set up'. Dantes is now determined on vengeance. Eight years pass while the prisoners dig an escape tunnel. However, Faria collapses and, as he dies, he bequeaths to Dantes buried treasure. When the grave-diggers come for Faria's body, Dantes takes his place in the shroud and escapes. 4. THE COUNT APPEARS. Dantes retrieves the treasure from the island of Monte-Cristo and assumes the guise of a count. In Venice he rescues Albert de Morcerf, Fernand's and Mercedes' son. Later arriving in Paris, the Count is introduced to Maximilian Morrel, the son of his former ship-owner, whom he at once befriends. However, when he meets Mercedes, now Madame de Morcerf, she faints. Monte-Cristo buys a house in Auteuil, once owned by the Marquis de Saint-Meran, Villefort's father-in-law. Bertuccio, the Count's servant, grows pale, however, because he believes it was here that he killed Villefort. Visiting Baron Danglars, Monte-Cristo impresses him with his wealth and obtains a six-million-franc loan. 5. SNARING THE GUILTY. Monte-Cristo's servant saves Madame de Villefort and her son, Eduard, from disaster. The Count then fascinates her with his knowledge of poisons. Noirtier, now paralysed, gestures to Valentine, Villefort's daughter by his first marriage, that he disapproves of her proposed marriage to Franz d'Epinay; she too dislikes it. Calling later, the Count finds the Villeforts incensed because Noirtier has changed his will to prevent the marriage. The Count holds a dinner party, where Bertuccio is amazed to find Villefort still alive. 6. THE NOOSE TIGHTENS. Monte-Cristo invites his pests to visit one of his rooms, but Villefort and Madame Danglars turn pale, for it brings back memories of past crimes. Monte-Cristo drags the two of them into the garden where he relates the discovery of a baby's skeleton, alarming them afresh. In another room Danglars meets the Cavalcantis, supposed Italian aristocrats, and is persuaded to lend them money. Villefort returns home and discovers that his parents-in-law have been poisoned. At their funeral, Noirtier reveals to Franz d'Epinay that he killed his father, thus wrecking his engagement to Valentine. Next, the name of Morcerf is ruined by allegations of past treachery. Attempting to clear his father, Albert challenges Monte-Cristo to a duel. 7. REVELATIONS. Mercedes pleads for the Count to spare her son - she has recognized him as Dantes. Albeit apologizes and, later receives a letter from Monte-Cristo bequeathing money to him and his mother. Calling on the Count, Fernand discovers his true identity, and commits suicide. Valentine now falls dangerously ill from poison. Maximilian tells Monte-Cristo that he loves Valentine and, awakened to the harm of his vengeance, the Count secretly saves her. However, believing her to be dead, Maximilian threatens suicide. The marriage of Danglars' daughter Eugenie to Count Cavalcanti is halted by the police who arrest the bridegroom as a criminal. During his trial, the accused reveals that he is Villefort's illegitimate son. 8. FINAL RECKONINGS. Disgraced, Villefort rushes home to find his wife and son poisoned. Monte-Cristo leaves Paris after supervising the kidnap of Danglars who is fleeing with stolen money. The Count then joins Maximilian on the island of Monte-Cristo, where the young man still insists on poisoning himself. However, Valentine appears as he loses consciousness and they are later reunited. Haydee, Monte-Cristo's slave, refuses her freedom and they sail away together

  • - A Poetry Selection
    by Rudyard Kipling
    £4.49

    Rudyard Kipling. With our almost religious zeal to categorise and pigeon hole everything it should come as little surprise that one of the poems we learnt at school should so regularly be voted the best ever poem. Whether 'If..' deserves that credit or not is irrelevant to this empire wandering artist who was not only a fine story teller but a great poet of the Empires, its people and views. This volume pulls together many of his best loved and most well known works for your listening pleasure and is read for you by Richard Mitchley, Gideon Wagner, Tim Graham and Ghizela Rowe. The poems are; Rudyard Kipling - An Introduction; If; Mandalay; Our Fathers Also; Gentleman Rankers; Fuzzy Wuzzy; The White Mans Burden; Tommy; The English Flag; Danny Deever; As The Bell Clinks; The Explanation; The Absent Minded Beggar; Old Mother Laidinwool; The Legend Of Evil; Seal Lullaby; Cruisers; Gunga Din; To The City Of Bombay; The Ballad Of East & West; Cities And Thrones And Powers; The Prairie; The Way Through The Woods; Pink Dominoes; Two Months; Cuckoo Song; The Egg Shell; L' Envoi (An Extract); Mother O' Mine; In Springtime; A Nativity; Recessional; My Fathers Chair; Cells; The Mother's Son; Kim

  • by Jerome K Jerome
    £6.99

    Three Men In A Boat ranks as one of the most amusing and agreeable books in the English language. Written soon after Jerome's marriage, it bubbles over with the happiness he felt. Rather than recording one particular trip, the story combines many boating excursions which Jerome had made with his friends. The three men round on each other when things go wrong but nothing serious mars the essentially sunny, idyllic nature of the book. The beautiful countryside through which its heroes pass is poetically described. 1. EXPEDITION PLANS. George, Harris, and J. are feeling seedy. Comparing symptoms, they realise that each of them is suffering from a whole range of aliments, J. being particularly concerned about his liver. They decide that what they need is a complete break. After discussing the alternatives, they decide on a Thames boating trip and begin to make plans. They argue about what to take and what not to take; George suggests that they need not take many clothes as they will be able to wash them in the Thames. 2. DEPARTURE. Unable to agree on what food to take with them, the Three men amass a mountain of supplies which J. volunteers to pack. To his dismay, the others leave him to it. After repeatedly having to repack to put in his boots or find his toothbrush, J. Hands over to George and Harris. Aided by Montmorency the dog, they proceed to make an even worse mess of it. The Three Men go to bed intent on an early start. Despites this, their landlady, Mrs Poppets, has to wake them at nine o' clock. George goes to work for the morning and Harris and J. reach Waterloo Station at eleven. They are unable to find a train for Kingston until they tip a driver to go that way instead of taking the mail to Exeter. 3. EMBARKATION. The boat is waiting and they set off, Harris rowing, J. steering and daydreaming - until they crash into the bank. As they pass Hampton court, J. recalls how Harris once led a party endlessly round and round its maze until rescued by an attendant. Stopping for lunch, they are accused of trespassing but are undeterred. At Weybridge, they rendezvous with George, who has brought a surprise: a banjo, which he is planning to learn to play. 4. EVENING ON THE WATER. Unwillingly, George starts towing and J. expounds on the delights he has experienced on other boating trips when being towed by girls; how it takes three girls to tow one boat. Finally evening draws in, the Three Men put up their boat's cover - discovering this is something which takes them a great deal longer than expected - and make supper. Afterwards, filled with good food and goodwill, they relax. But the boat makes a hard bed for the night and the wind is found to be disturbing. J. wakes before dawn to commune poetically with nature. 5. THE OPEN THAMES. In the grey chill of morning, the Three Men's earlier enthusiasm for a quick dip evaporates. George and Harris stay in the boat but J. creeps out on a branch to wash. Suddenly he falls in, much impressing the others, who think he is taking a swim. At lunch, unable to find a tin opener, they attempt to open a tin of pineapple with pocket-knife, scissors, a stone and finally the mast. All efforts fail and they throw the unopened tin into the Thames. Then, blessed by a favourable wind, they hoist sail and glide serenely on, straight into a punt of fishermen. 6. MARLOW AND BEYOND. At Marlow, J.'s fox-terrier Montmorency pursues a large tom cat. Instead of fleeing frantically, the cat turns round and coolly confronts him. Stunned, Montmorency backs down and gives up chasing cats for good. Meanwhile, the Three Men's shopping expedition grows until a whole army of grocery-carriers arrives at the little boat with their provisions. That evening they make Irish stew, adding everything they can find, including salmon and eggs. This upsets Harris's stomach and he stays behind while the others go to the pub. Returning in the rain, George and J. almost fail to find the boat. 7. OXFORD. J. is convinced he is doing more work than the others; oddly, the others think just the opposite. A friend's steam launch gives the boat a very useful tow from Reading to Streatley. Here the Three Men stay for two days and have their clothes professionally washed. They pay three times the normal price, as on George's advice they have tried washing their clothes on the river with disastrous results. Passing through a lock, J. recalls a time when they were nearly drowned while posing for a photograph, the boat's nose getting caught under the lock gate without their noticing. Finally, the Three Men reach their goal - Oxford. 8. THREE MEN OUT OF A BOAT. At Oxford Montmorency has plenty of good fights, and after two days the Three Men turn for home. The weather has turned too, with steady rain that chills them through and through. A cold supper fails to restore them and George's attempts at banjo playing make things a great deal worse. They recall the delight of London and remember there is a convenient train. Shamefacedly, they leave the boat and take a train back, seeing a show at the Alhambra and dining at the Bistro, happy to be out of a boat

  • by James Fenimore Cooper
    £6.99

    Set in the wild forests between the British and French colonies in the mid-18th-century wars, The Last of the Mohicans brims with action. Hawk-eye, first of the tough but honourable heroes of the frontier, leads a mixed band on a perilous journey. In the course of their experiences, all are tested to the utmost. Hawk-eye and Chingachgook reveal true courage, Heyward shows doggedness and Magua proves treacherous. Uncas, last of the Mohicans, emerges as their saviour - but too late to save Cora, the heroine.

  • by Oscar Wilde
    £7.99 - 9.49

    THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is undoubtably Oscar Wilde's best known play probably due to its sharp wit that cannot help but enchant and entertain any reader, theatregoer or listener with this performance. Here his economic and finely honed words are delivered by a superb cast that is headed by England's finest, namely Sir John Gielgud and Dame Edith Evans that help make this the ultimate listening experience for fans of classic theatre.

  • by F Scott Fitzgerald
    £6.99

    When The Great Gatsby was published, commercially it was a failure but critically it was a success. It is still the most admired and well read of all Scott Fitzgerald's novels and it is considered a handbook of the 'Jazz Age'. Scott Fitzgerald put much of himself and his life into the book. He created the character of Jay Gatsby to illustrate his own experiences of the illusory and morally bankrupt aspects of 1920s' America, and the character of Nick Carraway to show his disapproval of its destructive effects. 1. A WORLDLY LIFE. Narrator Nick Carraway explains how he came to New York. He rents a house in West Egg, next to a mansion owned by a mysterious millionaire, Jay Gatsby, and across the bay from his cousin Daisy Buchanan. Visiting her and her husband Tom, he is introduced to Jordan Baker and learns from her that Tom is having an affair. On his way home Nick sees Gatsby looking across the water, arms outstretched. 2. IMMORALITY. Nick is surprised when, en route to New York, Tom insists that he meet his mistress. They go to Wilson's garage, where Tom tells the proprietor's wife Myrtle to come to New York. There, a drunken party gets under way. It ends abruptly when Tom and Myrtle quarrel and he strikes her, breaking her nose. 3. HIGH LIVING. Nick goes to one of Gatsby's parties, where he sees Jordan again and eventually meets his host. Gatsby asks to speak to Jordan alone. Nick falls for Jordan and sees one of Gatsby, who tells him the story of his privileged past; he also says that Jordan will let Nick in on a secret. 4. A DREAM OF LOVE. Nick has lunch with Gatsby and one of his business associates Meyer Wolfshiem. That afternoon, Jordan tells Nick that Daisy and Gatsby were in love during the war. Gatsby is still besotted and wants Nick to invite her to tea so that they can meet again. Nick agrees and warns Daisy not to bring Tom. 5. REALITY INTRUDES. Daisy is amazed to see Gatsby again and he is overwhelmed. Gatsby takes Nick and Daisy to his house, keen to impress Daisy. However, he evades Nick's question about his business. At the point, Nick reveals Gatsby's true, humble origins to the reader. When Nick next sees Gusby, a guest brings Tom in for a drink, with the result that Tom is invited to Gatsby's next party. There he voices his suspicions that his host's riches are ill-gotten and Daisy expresses loathing of the fashionable crowd and their 'new' money. 6. ADULTERY DISCOVERED. After the party, Gatsby explains to Nick that he wants Daisy to tell Tom that she never loved him, then leave him; he refuses to heed Nick's warning that he cannot undo the past and tells him all about their love affair. Gatsby has no more parties because they do not please Daisy. Nick, Jordan and Gatsby have lunch with Tom and Daisy; Tom realizes that Daisy is having an affair with Gatsby. They drive to New York - Daisy and Gatsby in Tom's car and Tom, Nick and Jordan in Gatsby's. Tom stops for petrol at the garage, where Myrtle is watching from a window. Wilson has realized that she has been unfaithful, although he does not know with whom. In New York, the group hire a hotel room, where Tom confronts Gatsby. 7. A TRAGIC ACCIDENT. Gatsby tells Tom that Daisy does not love him; he reacts furiously and accuses Gatsby of bootlegging. Although she half-heartedly agrees that she is leaving Tom, Daisy cannot say, as Gatsby demands, that she never loved him. Finally, Daisy and Gatsby leave, this time in Gatsby's car; they kill Myrtle, who runs towards them believing that Tom is in the car. Tom, following in his own car, stops at the scene and quickly denies any involvement. That night, Gatsby confides the secret of his past to Nick, explains how he and Daisy were separated and says that he will take the blame for the accident to protect her. In the morning, Nick leaves for work and Gatsby goes to his swimming-pool. As they part, Nick tells Gatsby that he is 'worth the whole damn bunch put together'. 8. A LONELY END. Wilson, overcome by grief and rage, believes his wife has been murdered by her lover. He shoots Gatsby dead, then kills himself. Nick finds their bodies and learns that Daisy and Tom have gone away. While at Gatsby's mansion, Nick receives a mysterious telephone call which inadvertently confirms that Gatsby was a criminal. Gatsby's father arrives for the funeral, but Wolfshiem refuses to come and only one of the party guests attends. Worn out by the events of the East and too sickened to continue his relationship with Jordan, Nick decides to go home to the Midwest. Some time later, he bumps into Tom in New York and learns that, as he believed, it was Tom who told Wilson that Gatsby was driving the car

  • by Jane Austen
    £6.99

    Pride and Prejudice is a masterpiece of wit and perception, ridiculing the superficial manners of Jane Austen's time. But it is more than just social satire. Notice, in particular, how the author's close attention to detail makes the events and characters so true to life. Above all, enjoy the story - its sheer narrative force and humour - and enter a world of snobbery, romance and uncertainty, in which people behave casually, indifferently or even cruelly - in short just like people behave everywhere in the world today.

  • by Daniel Defoe
    £4.49 - 6.99

    Born in Newgate Prison and abandoned soon after, Moll Flanders is searching for a secure place in society. Her desire to belong propels her into all kinds of trouble from numerous marriages, bigamy and incest to theft. Charting her progress from an innocent but determined young girl to a contentedly resigned elderly woman, Defoe's novel casts a light on the splendours and iniquities of life in 18th century England and America. It is a tale of sin and repentance, portrayed through a rich pageant of comical scenes.

  • by Louisa May Alcott
    £6.99 - 9.99

    Little Women is constructed as a series of episodes which are almost complete stories in their own right. Incidents in the lives of the March sisters act as fables, each illustrating a moral point. In her novel, Louisa May Alcott describes her characters' daily lives, creating a patchwork picture of genteel poverty in mid-19th-century America. Meg works as a governess, Jo as a companion and all the women of the family sew, knit, mend and engage in charitable works. So, Alcott creates a true-to-life backdrop to her engaging tale.

  • by Mary Shelley
    £6.99

    The story of Victor Frankenstein, a Swiss scientist, starts and ends in the frozen wastes of the Arctic. There, he tells Robert Walton, his English rescuer, about his obsessive quest to create life and its disastrous results. He has attempted to make a superhuman and succeeded in producing a terrible monster instead. The being is physically repulsive and Frankenstein, terrified by what he has done, abandons him. Neglected and uncared for, the creature turns to evil. Many of the other characters, from the angelic Elizabeth to the faithful friend Henry Clerval, innocently face their violent dooms because of Frankenstein's quarrel with his creature.

  • by Jane Austen
    £6.99

    Emma is one of the most delightful but also one of the most domineering of Jane Austen's heroines. Her attempts at manipulating other people's lives start in fun and end in hurt feelings and embarrassment for all concerned. The frothiness of the novel gives way to a deeper moral message, and all ends well - better than Emma could have imagined. Throughout the story Jane Austen loses no opportunity to describe with ironic wittiness the society of Highbury and the conventions of the day. The many characters are clearly and finely drawn to create a tiny world in which interest is sustained to the final matching of couples for wedding vows.

  • by Bram Stoker
    £6.99

    Fast paced and nightmarishly vivid, this greatest of Gothic tales propels the reader into the heart of darkness from its opening pages. Stoker increases the tension and mystery of his masterpiece by setting it in the form of different journal entries and letters by various characters. Only gradually does the full horrifying picture emerge: Dracula, far from being merely an eccentric foreigner, is a threat to all mankind. But this is not discovered until it is too late for some. Storms and wolves, shipwrecks and gypsies, haunted castles and graveyards: the horrors pile up until the final moment of triumph seconds before sunset.

  • - Time Hunter (Unabridged)
    by Stefan Petrucha
    £11.49

    Synopsis: In the heart of post-war London, a bomb is discovered lodged at a disused station between Green Park and Hyde Park Corner. The bomb detonates, and as the dust clears, it becomes apparent that something has been awakened. Strange half-human creatures attack the workers at the site, hungrily searching for anything containing sugar . . . Meanwhile, Honore and Emily are contacted by eccentric poet Randolph Crest, who believes himself to be the target of these subterranean creatures. The ensuing investigation brings Honore and Emily up against a terrifying force from deep beneath the earth, and one which even with their combined powers, they may have trouble stopping. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Stefan Petrucha has been a professional writer of comics, novels and scripts for well over a decade. His first vampire novel, Dark Ages: Assamite is just being reprinted, having attracted rave reviews and quickly selling out its first print run. Petrucha is the writer and creator of such comic book characters as Squalor, Meta-4, Counterparts and The Bandy Man. He has also scripted over a hundred comic book adventures for Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck for Egmont Publishing in Denmark, which have been published in more than thirty-five languages. He currently writes dark fantasy novels for White Wolf Publishing and comic books for Moonstone Books and his latest comic, Kolchak: Devil in the Details, is already being hailed as a classic in the series. www.petrucha.com ABOUT THE READER: Mary Tamm graduated from RADA, and made her television debut in the series The Donati Conspracy. Her early television credits include Coronation Street, Public Eye and Return Of The Saint, and on film she appeared in The Likely Lads and The Odessa File, before being cast as the icy Time Lady companion Romana, opposite Tom Baker, in Doctor Who. Since leaving the show Tamm's career has continued to flourish on stage and screen, encompassing such productions as Bergerac, Agatha Christie: Poirot, Heartbeat, Holby City, Jonathan Creek, Wire In The Blood and regular parts in both Brookside (as Penny Crosbie) and the BBC drama Paradise Heights. In 2009 the film Doghouse was released in which Mary stars alongside Danny Dyer and Noel Clark. www.marytamm.com

  • - Time Hunter
    by Claire Bott
    £11.49

    Synopsis: Honore and Emily find themselves imprisoned in the 19th Century by a celebrated inventor ... but help comes from an unexpected source - a humanoid automaton created by, and to give pleasure to, its owner. As the trio escape to London, they are unprepared for what awaits them, and at every turn it seems impossible to avert what fate may have in store for the Clockwork Woman. Part mystery, part detective story, part dark fantasy, part science fiction... original adventures in time and space. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Claire Bott is a journalist, currently working full time as a staff writer on Publishing News magazine. She used to be a performance poet, before realising there was no money in it and opting to be a hack instead. She quickly found out there was no money in journalism either, but by then she was hooked and it was too late. She wrote for The Independent, Men's Health and Comics International before settling down at Publishing News. The Clockwork Woman is her first book. ABOUT THE READER: Tracey has just finished a sell-out run playing Martha to Matthew Kelly's George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at London's Trafalgar Studios. Tracey is best known for playing Lynne Howard in the popular eighties drama Howards' Way, and Linda Cosgrove in the long running Born and Bred. Theatre credits include The New Vic's production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Great Gatsby, Sybil in Private Lives, Stepping Out, No Sex Please, We're British, Why Me?, The Hollow and The Unexpected Guest. Television work includes Prometheus, playing Rose in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, The Devil's Crown, The Amazing Affair of Adelaide Harris, Strangers, Landseer- Working Out The Beast, playing Marianne in Sense and Sensibility, Bergerac, Jane Eyre, Captain Zep, A Talent for Murder, As Seen on TV and Dempsey and Makepeace

  • - Time Hunter
    by Daniel O'Mahoney
    £11.49

    Synopsis: Honore Lechasseur, a "e;fixer"e; with time-sensitive abilities, is hired by Emily Blandish to find someone known only as Doctor Smith. He soon discovers that Doctor Smith is a legendary figure that has drifted in and out of Earth's history. As he follows the trail of Doctor Smith, questions arise: what is the Doctor's connection with 1949 London and with the mysterious "e;cabinet of light"e; that another group is seeking? ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Daniel O'Mahony has written a number of original and Doctor Who novels including 'Falls the Shadow' (Virgin, 1994), 'The Man in the Velvet Mask' (Virgin, 1996), 'Force Majeure' (Telos, 2007), 'Newton's Sleep' (Random Static, 2008) as well as three audio dramas for Big Finish productions including 'Return to the Web Planet' (2007). ABOUT THE READER: Terry Molloy is an experience radio and television actor. Most notably he is best known as Mike Tucker in BBC Radio 4's 'The Archers', while on television he played the Doctor's evil nemesis Davros during the 1980s! He has also recently appeared on BBC 7 in the role of Professor Edward Dunning in 'The Scarifyers' produced by Cosmic Hobo Productions

  • by Victor Pemberton
    £9.99

    Synopsis: Refusing to believe that his son is dead, Judge Mathew Deacon travels across the Atlantic to Cambridge to search for evidence of his son's fate. However when his enquiries take him to the isolated homestead of the Northcotts, he discovers the real circumstances behind his son's sudden disappearance - and the secrets which have permeated the Northcott family for generations. THE CAST - Matthew Deacon: Neil Summerville - Mrs Northcott: Fenella Fielding - Prof. Forrester: Ian Brooker - Nicholas: Daniel King - Sybil: Kiki Kendrik - Griffin: Luke Harris - Dorothy: Laura James. Directed & Produced by Dexter O'Neill. http://www.victorpemberton.com/radio 'NIGHT OF THE WOLF' (1984) - An original ninety minute gothic horror play about a werewolf on the loose in the Fenlands of East Anglia. Originally commissioned as a starring vehicle for the American film actor, James Stewart, but eventually starring Vincent Price and his wife Coral Browne. For SATURDAY NIGHT THEATRE, and subsequent BBC audio tape

  • - Time Hunter
    by John Paul Catton
    £11.49

    Synopsis: In the year 2020, Honore Lechasseur and Emily Blandish find themselves thrown into a mystery as an ice spirit wreaks havoc during the Kyoto's Gion Festival, and a haunted funhouse proves to contain more than just paper lanterns and wax dummies. But what does all this have to do with the elegant owner of the Hide and Chic fashion chain... and to the legendary Japanese fox-spirits, the Kitsune? Part mystery, part detective story, part dark fantasy, part science fiction... original adventures in time and space. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: John Paul Catton lives and works in Tokyo, where he teaches English language and literature. He has worked freelance for various magazines in Japan, the UK and the USA, including Metropolis, Tokyo Eye Ai and The London Time Out Guide to Tokyo. His short fiction and comic strips have appeared in 'Roadworks', 'Terror Tales', 'Xenos' among others, and he has a regular column appear in the magazine 'The Third Alternative' ABOUT THE READER: Terry Molloy is an experience radio and television actor. Most notably he is best known as Mike Tucker in BBC Radio 4's 'The Archers', while on television he played the Doctor's evil nemesis Davros during the 1980s! He has also recently appeared on BBC 7 in the role of Professor Edward Dunning in 'The Scarifyers' produced by Cosmic Hobo Productions

  • by Dr Crippen
    £6.99

    Great British Trials presents a fascinating glimpse into three of the most notorious crimes and trials of the last 100 years. Through original trial transcripts, eyewitness accounts and contemporary newspaper reports, we witness the actual events that made each trial a cause celebre of its day. Mild-mannered Dr Hawley Harvey Crippen committed one of the most famous English murders of the 20th century - in early 1910 he dismembered his wife's body and buried the remains. His subsequent trial at the Old Bailey was expected to be a mere formality, but Dr Crippen pleaded 'Not Guilty!', and so begins this strangely moving tale of passion and despair. The Trial of Doctor Crippen starring Andrew Sachs as Dr Hawley Harvey Crippen Fully dramatised starring Andrew Sachs; Norman Bird; Geoffrey Whitehead; John Baddeley; Teresa Gallagher; Howard Ward; Robin Welch; Andrew Wincott.

  • by Sheila Steafel
    £11.99

    When I read through the final draft of my autobiography, I decided to take out several anecdotes about my personal life, simply because they seemed a sort of indulgence, and didn't add to what I wanted to say about my life and my career. They were hiccups along the way with some attacks worse than others, but all were finally 'got rid' (as my cousin Lillian used to say). I put them in a file which I called BASTARDS for my own amusement, and thought no more about them until my book came out and I was being asked what my next writing project would be. For want of anything else to say I would reply BASTARDS, and the response was so positive that what had started as a whim began to take on substance. So here it is. Since you ask (and you will) the bastards were all my own. Some were short, as are some of the tales, and some tall, which, in spite of your incredulity, none of the tales are. Well, I've said it before and I'll say it again, I couldn't make them up! Could I?

  • by Jacqueline Pearce
    £11.99

    The actress Jacqueline Pearce is best known to television audiences as the villainous Servalan from the fondly remembered Blake's Seven (BBC 1978-1981). But her career has taken her from RADA to Hollywood, via starring roles in international comedy films, Hammer Horror, BBC Shakespeare, and London's West End. So how did she end up living in the African bush with her belongings in black bin-bags? Find out with this gripping memoir of an extraordinary life - from Byfleet to the Bush. Jacqueline's motherless upbringing in suburban Byfleet was unconventional and her education at the hands of nuns left her emotionally scarred. Through the course of her erratic career, she found love, laughter, heartache, breakdowns, fame, obscurity, and sex drugs and rock and roll. On the way, she encountered such stars as Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, Sammy Davis Jr, Jerry Lewis, Alan Bates, John Hurt, Dervla Kirwan and Rupert Penry-Jones. Candid, vivid, mordant and funny, this is an unusual and enchanting memoir.

  • by Alexandre Dumas
    £5.99

    The Short Stories Of Alexandre Dumas. The short story is often viewed as an inferior relation to the Novel. But it is an art in itself. To take a story and distil its essence into fewer pages while keeping character and plot rounded and driven is not an easy task. Many try and many fail. In this series we look at short stories from many of our most accomplished writers. Miniature masterpieces with a lot to say. In this volume we examine some of the short stories of Alexandre Dumas. Alexandre Dumas born into poverty in 1802. Complicating his life was his African ancestry which gave rise to much racist behaviour against him despite being seven eighths French. Raised by his mother after his Father's death by age 4 he was a voracious reader. At age 20, with the restoration of the French Monarchy he went to Paris to attend on The Duke of Orleans. Thereafter he began to write plays and two early successes allowed him to write full time. Dumas helped in the revolution of 1830 which installed his former employer as the new King. In his late 30s came the books he is so well known for "e;The Three Musketeers"e; and "e;The Count Of Monte Cristo"e; and with these and others his fame was set both in France and across the World. Dumas was a great wanderer spending years in Belgium, Russia and Italy. A prolific writer on politics and travel we look here at his short works including the classic; Martin Guerre. It is a work of great power holding the attention and asking questions about what is real and what if..... Some of these stories are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Word Of Mouth. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortablePoetry?feature=mhee The full volume can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores and read for you by Richard Mitchley. Index Of Stories; Martin Guerre

  • by Daniel Sheehan
    £4.49

    The Poetry Of Daniel Sheehan. Poetry is a fascinating use of language. With almost a million words at its command it is not surprising that these Isles have produced some of the most beautiful, moving and descriptive verse through the centuries. In this series we look at a poet who is a frequent contributor to anthologies and collections and is here published in his own collection for the first time; Daniel Sheehan. If is famously said that no man is an island. But perhaps many are mysteries. Some seek limelight, others the shadows. In the case of Daniel Sheehan either little is known of him or he wants little to be known. Probably the latter. His work hints at a great love and a journey that is unknown but almost unimportant as to its destination. It is a journey with someone and for someone. His words of the heart, his thoughts of the soul. In short a modern romantic, someone to make the world little less harsh but a little more important. In this internet age surprisingly little is known of him so there is little to tell except in his verse from the past 3 years or so. We have recorded many of his poems and they are available as an audiobook from our sister company Portable Poetry. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortablePoetry?feature=mhee The full volume can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores. The poems are read for you by Ghizela Rowe & Richard Mitchley. Index Of Poems; But Stay A While; I Carry The Cross Of A Minor Faith; The Whispered Meaning; Like Flames In A Catholic Night; At The Mercy Goes The Light; No Juice In The Tank Now; And The Man Who Sold His Armies; Razored By Emotions; This Journey May Not End; I Must Be A Vampire; Flakes Of Comfort; That Endless Loop; I Am Your Father; That Kiss; In My Thoughts I Kiss You; And I Run To You; Words Will Rupture; Once Your Kiss Would Make Me Dizzy; Deeper I Cannot Fall; In The Safety Of Your Mouth; An Atheist's Journey; And Your Feet Are The Author, Your Eyes Every Page; This Black Ribbon Freeway; In The Belly Of This Metal Beast; The Ancient Arteries Of America; By My Two Feet And Endless Times; In This Journey; I Am Lonely For The Shadows; Raise Me; The Stillness Of Angels; At Sundown; In This Summer; Winter Calls; Twilight Shadows; I Am An Irish Son; To Bathe My Face; This Scottish Ground; And I Run To You; In My Thoughts I Kiss You; Words Will Rupture; Beauty's Last Angel; If My Fingers Could Torture The Keys On This Board; That Kiss; It Is Autumn; It Is Winter; A Winter's Sad Retreat; Amongst The Redwoods, Giant And Still; I Am Your Mother And You My Child; A Mother's Love - Where She Goes She Is Not Gone; Faulted Dreams; Winter's Naked Woods; No Mercy Here; December Sales Drive; God Arrest Ye Merry Gentlemen; Some Days The Truth Is Bitter; Across The Lines; In Your Heart I Know That I Have Left; Promises That Fail Their Makers Lips; An Atheist's Christmas; That Red Leather Ball; My Peace With Eternity; This Untold Heart Shall Yet Have Name; Bone Deep Damp; My Muscled Soul; Broken By Love; My Peace With Eternity; The Stillness Of Angels; I Am What He Writes About; This Edge Of Love; I Have Colors In My Head; I Have Mercy Now For No One; Your Words Were Not Victims; In The Fear; Here In The Nightmare; In This Fog; To Mock You Hollow; With Your Words Denied; My Dreams Once Had Mercy; The Solitude Of Tears; Was Once My Heartbeat; In This Night; Across The Years; On Anniversary Days; In Every Step; In The Violent Coloured Skies; Yesterday's Truth; Heaven Holds You Now; In The Graveyard Stands The Stone; As The Years And Decades Slowly Pass; If Time Should Splinter; I Saw You Turn; My Name Is Stolen From Beauty's Own Blood; Cranking 'Long The Road; The Night Has Passed; At Night My Eyes Look Up; As My Footsteps Weary To The Grave; If My Roots Are Torn; I Hear The Giddy Hoops; The Monotone Of Innocence; Why Has An Angel Died; I Can't Decide By Words; The Stars Are Your Fame

  • by George Eliot
    £4.49

    George Eliot, The Poetry. Poetry is a fascinating use of language. With almost a million words at its command it is not surprising that these Isles have produced some of the most beautiful, moving and descriptive verse through the centuries. In this series we look at individual poets who have shaped and influenced their craft and cement their place in our heritage. In this volume we look at the works of the Victorian Authoress and Poet George Eliot. Mary Anne Evans was born in 1819. Her Father did not consider her a great beauty and thought her chances of marriage were slim. He therefore invested in her education and by the time she was 16 she had boarded at several schools acquiring a good education. With the death of her mother in 1835 she returned home to keep house for her father and siblings. By 1850 she had moved to London to work at the Westminster Review where she published many articles and essays. The following year Mary Anne or Marian, as she liked to be called, had met George Henry Lewes, and in 1854 they moved in together; a somewhat scandalous situation as he was already married albeit with complications. Her view on literature had taken some time to coalescence but with the publication of parts of Scenes From A Clerical Life in 1858 she knew she wanted to be a novelist and as her 1856 titled essay "e;Silly Novels by Lady Novelists"e; stated not a 'silly woman's one at that. Under the pseudonym of George Eliot that we know so well Adam Bede followed in 1859 followed by the other great novels of English literature Mill On The Floss, Silas Marner and Middlemarch. Success of course meant that her real name came out but it seemed not to affect how the public devoured her novels. Here, we look with a keen eye at her poetry. Although slim in number she is able to take a situation, scene or thought and bring us into its world with undeniable care. Many of the poems are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Portable Poetry. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortablePoetry?feature=mhee The full volume can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. Index Of Poems; Mother And Poet; Nature's Lady; To A Skylark; Mid My Gold-Brown Curls; Brother And Sister; How Lisa Loved the King; How They Brought The Good News From Ghent To Aix; Blue Wings; Bright, O Bright Fedalma!

  • by John Keats
    £4.49

    John Keats - The Poetry Of. Keats. The name is synonymous with great romantic poetry and great romantic poets. A short life but a legacy of works that few if any can rival. And of course his end was to be tragically romantic. Keats was returning one night to his home in Hampstead when he coughed. He coughed a single drop of blue blood upon his hand and said 'I know the colour of that blood, it is arterial blood, it is my death warrant, I must die. And so it was that tuberculosis took its slow devastating hold. He moved to Rome hoping the warmer climate would help but died at age 25 in 1821. These poems are read for you by Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe

  • by Henry Alford
    £4.49

    Henry Alford, The Poetry. Poetry is a fascinating use of language. With almost a million words at its command it is not surprising that these Isles have produced some of the most beautiful, moving and descriptive verse through the centuries. In this series we look at individual poets who have shaped and influenced their craft and cement their place in our heritage. In this volume we look at the works of the Victorian Poet Henry Alford. Alford was born in London in 1810. Something of a prodigy he had published several Latin odes and a history of the Jews by the time he was 10. Graduating from Cambridge his life was to follow in the family footsteps of being a clergyman and he held the post of Vicar at Wymeswold in Leicestershire, for the next 18 years. Shortly after this he became the Dean of Canterbury. Much of his career highlights are based on his theology and such works as his startling 4 volume edition of the New Testament in Greek. But in this volume we concentrate on his poems. A fine example of a Victorian poet who managed to write several volumes of his own verse, his work is undeniably religious in tone but it has that quality of wonderment of expressing something beyond and apart from themselves. Many of the poems are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Portable Poetry. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortablePoetry?feature=mhee The full volume can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. Index Of Poems; Written January 1st 1832; Written During An Aurora Borealis January 7th 1831; Sonnet 59; Sonnet XLIII. The Malvern Hills, March 12th 1835; April 1844; Sonnet LVII - Summit Of Skiddaw, July 7th 1838; August 19th 1830; August the 22nd 1830; Sonnet XXL, Sacred To The Memory Of Edward Spedding Who Died September 3rd 1832; The National Prayer, October 1840; November 1847; Lines Written October 23rd 1836, A Few Hours After The Birth Of My First Child; February 3rd 1830; February 10th 1840; A Day Dream; A Doubt; A Truant Hour; Anticipation; Be Just And Fear Not; Faith; Life's Answer; Life's Question; Midnight Thoughts; Peace; Rydal Mount; Sonnet LVIII. Descent Of The Same; Sonnet LXIV. Written At Ghent; Sonnet LXXX. My Ancestors; Sonnet LXXXVII. We Want But Little: In The Morning Tide; Sonnet LXXXVIII. The Inward Pleasure Of Our Human Soul; Sonnet XCVIII. There Is One Baptism; Sonnet XCIX. Day By Day We Magnify Thee; Sonnet XLV. When I Behold Thee, Only Living One; Sonnet XLVI. Each Morn The Same Sun Rises On Our Day; Sonnet XLVIII. Sleep, Gentle Love! And Let The Soothing Dew; Sonnet XXII. The Dying Bed; Sonnet XXIV. The Same Sonnet XXV. The Funeral; Sonnet XXVIII. O When Shall This Frail Tenement Of Day; Sonnet XXX. On Seeing Our Family Vault; Sonnet XXXV. Twere Better Far From Noon To Eventide; Sonnet XXXVI. The Gipsy Girl; Sonnet XXXVIII. Epiphany; Sonnet VII. Truth Loveth Not To Lavish Upon All; The Ancient Man; The Bride; The Land's End; The Little Mourner; The Passion Of St. Agnes; The Salzburg Chimes; To A Beautiful Female Portrait; To A Drop Of Dew; To A Moonbeam By Our Fireside; Two Fragments; You And I

  • by Alfred Austin
    £4.49

    Alfred Austin, The Poetry. Poetry is a fascinating use of language. With almost a million words at its command it is not surprising that these Isles have produced some of the most beautiful, moving and descriptive verse through the centuries. In this series we look at individual poets who have shaped and influenced their craft and cement their place in our heritage. In this volume we look at the works of the Victorian Poet Laureate, Alfred Austin. Born in Headingly, Yorkshire in 1835 Austin went on to graduate from the University of London in 1853. Training to be a barrister was a success but his love was literature and he turned to this full time as a novelist, playwright and poet. After several false starts he published as a poet in 1861, it arrived with a measure of success. In 1870 he wrote a book 'Poetry Of The Period; which managed to criticise the great Victorian poets of Tennyson, Arnold, Swinburne and Browning without an undue measure of negativity. With the death of Tennyson in 1892 a number of candidates were looked at for the post of Poet Laureate. Finally in 1896 after it was rejected by William Morris the post was Austin's. His work was entwined with his love of Nature and he is a fine example of this Imperial age. His poems have a softness, texture and comfort that is deeply rewarding. Alfred Austin died in 1913. Many of the poems are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Portable Poetry. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortablePoetry?feature=mhee The full volume can be purchased from iTunes, Amazon and other digital stores. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. Index Of Poems; To England; Songs From Lucifer; Agatha; Song, A March Minstrel; An April Fool; An April Love; A Night In June; Give A November Note; Give Me October's Meditative Haze; December Matins; A Border Burn; A Captive Throstle; A Farewell To Youth; A Rare Guest; A Reply To A Pessimist; A Sleepless Night; A Voice From The West; A Wild Rose; At Her Grave; By The Fates; Celestial Heights; Free Forgiveness; Gleaners Of Fame; How Florence Rings Her Bells; In Praise Of England; In Sutton Woods; Inflexible As Fate; Love's Harvest; Love's Unity; My Winter Rose; Primacy Of Mind; Resignation; Since We Must Die; Sorrow's Importunity; Spartan Mothers; Spiritual Love; The Evening Light; The Mountains; The Passing Of The Century; The Silent Muse; Though All The World; Time's Weariness; Too Late; Unseasonable Snows; Wardens Of The Wave; When Acorns Fall; When I Am Gone; Winter Violets

  •  
    £8.49

    The Travellers Gazette is a vivid portrait of British life through the centuries, as lived by the generations of men and women who took part. We follow in the footsteps of the intrepid British traveller as they explore the world both at home and abroad and eavesdrop on their personal recollections providing us with an entertaining collection of wry anecdotes and finely observed detail. In the At Home edition, we embark on a fascinating ramble through the towns and villages of the British Isles during the last 400 years in the company of Jane Austen, William Cobbett, Daniel Defoe, James Lees Milne, Sir Walter Scott, Virginia Woolf and many others as we travel by steam ship, mail coach and hot air balloon from Cornwall to the Scottish Highlands. Narrated by Eileen Atkins; Cheryl Campbell; Nigel Davenport; Alex Jennings; Richard Johnson; Hugh Laurie; Michael Maloney; Geoffrey Palmer; Michael Pennington; Prunella Scales; Samuel West, and John Wood.

  •  
    £8.49

    The Travellers' Gazette Abroad follows in the footsteps of the intrepid British traveller as he explores the far flung shores of the world. Compiled from the writings of some of the finest Chroniclers, Diarists and Litter-writers, we join Charles Darwin, Kenneth Williams, Freya Stark, Sir Ernest Shackleton, Mungo Park, Wilfred Thesiger and many others as they witness the murder of Captain Cook in the Pacific Islands, travel the first commercial flight from Paris to London, join a Maharajah's birthday party and are shipwrecked in North America in this fascinating collection of traveller's tales, as part of the Gazette's vivid portrait of British life through the centuries.

  • by George Mann
    £11.49

    What links a clutch of sinister murders in Victorian London, an angel appearing in a Staffordshire village in the 1920s and a small boy running loose around the capital in 1950? When Honore and Emily encounter a man who appears to have been cut out of time, they think they have the answer. But soon enough they discover that the mystery is only just beginning and that nightmares can turn into reality. Part mystery, part detective story, part dark fantasy, part science fiction... original adventures in time and space.

  • by H.P Lovecraft
    £11.49

    Considered to the be one of most influential American authors, Howard Philip Lovecraft is synonymous with some of the best fantasy and horror fiction of the 20th century, second only to Edgar Allan Poe. When local newspapers report strange things seen floating in rivers during a historic Vermont flood, Albert Wilmarth becomes embroiled in a controversy about the reality and significance of the sightings, however it isn't until he receives communication from Henry Wentworth Akeley that he is offered the proof he requires... Written in 1930, and originally published in Weird Tales a year later - The Whisperer in Darkness - is still as powerful today as it was 80 years ago. "e;Lovecraft opened the way for me, as he had done for other before me"e;. Stephen King

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