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  • by Mauro F. Guillen
    £16.99

    THE WORLD IS CHANGING DRASTICALLY BEFORE OUR EYES - WILL YOU BE PREPARED FOR WHAT COMES NEXT?2030 is a groundbreaking analysis by one of the world's foremost experts on global trends - from the shifting nature of retirement to the emergence of a new middle class, the rise of women as entrepreneurs and the end of modern banking. This essential guide to the future ends with insight into how COVID-19 will amplify and accelerate each of these changes.

  • by Lyndsy Spence
    £5.99

    MARGARET, DUCHESS OF ARGYLL was an international celebrity in her youth, adored and observed by millions. But in 1963 the 11th Duke of Argyll shocked the country when he alleged that his adulterous wife had slept with over eighty men behind his back. As his evidence, he produced a set of sexually explicit Polaroid photographs and explosive love letters, helping to win his divorce and affecting Margaret's life forever. On the verge of financial destitution, she fell from grace and was abandoned by most of her friends prior to her death in a nursing home in Pimlico in 1993. In this meticulously researched biography Lyndsy Spence tells a tragic story of the life and downfall of this fascinatingly complex woman, and shows how she fell victim to a cruel husband, harsh social mores and an unforgiving class.

  • by Neil Thomas
    £13.99

    Re-fight some of the bloodiest battles of the ancient and medieval worlds! Seasoned wargamer and author Neil Thomas brings historical perspective to the hobby with a description and interpretation of significant military developments from 3,000BC to AD1500. Wargaming is the simulation of accurate historical battles using miniature figures to fight over three dimensional terrain, their movement and combat being regulated by clearly defined rules. Neil Thomas' new book provides specific coverage of ancient and medieval wargaming, thanks to its division into biblical, classical, Dark Age and medieval sections. Each section has its own set of rules and much expanded army lists. The wargamer gains additional perspective from data panels containing facts about weaponry, personalities and chroniclers, and quotations from original document sources. Useful suggestions for further reading are also included, while battle reports in each section provide tactical insights for both novice and veteran wargamers.

  • by Alec Forshaw
    £6.49

    It is said that, however long you live, and however far you travel, the streets and fields where you played as a child will always be home to you. So Cambridge is for Alec Forshaw. This is a story of a childhood in Cambridge in the 1950s and '60s, followed by three undergraduate years and three decades of frequent and regular visits until the ties of the parental home were broken. These are memories set down before they too disappear and they recall a Cambridge which for many will have faded. Those who have read Gwen Raverat's Period Piece: A Cambridge Childhood will have seen in her description of the town and its society a different world. The reminiscences herein may rekindle more recent recollections, or simply entertain and amuse.

  • - The Original Story of 'Operation Mincemeat' - Both Fact and Fiction - by the Men Who Were There
    by Ewen Montagu
    £4.99

    The greatest deception of the Second World War - and possibly in the whole of military history - took place in April 1943 when a body was found floating in the sea off the Spanish coast. The documents found on him would eventually find their way to Hitler's desk and send German troops hurtling in the wrong direction. The dead man convinced the Axis powers that the Allies were about to attack Greece and not the real target, Sicily. The course of the war was changed. In this volume is a story within the original extraordinary story. Duff Cooper's only fictional work, Operation Heartbreak, was based upon the emotionally charged decision to use an anonymous corpse to weave the web of deceit. The British authorities tried to suppress the book because it would show the Spanish in a bad light, with Franco now in power. A change of heart followed and Ewen Montagu was encouraged to tell the whole story. Anyone who read Ben Macintyre's best-selling Operation Mincemeat will have to read this double volume to understand the full story.

  • by Julia Abel Smith
    £12.49 - 14.49

  • by Nathan Morley
    £12.49

  • by MICHAEL HANDRICKS
    £16.99

  • by Raymond Lamont-Brown
    £5.99

    Ever wondered how fat Henry VIII really was? Or what made Mary I 'Bloody'? Over many hundreds of years royalty has had its fair share of accidents, rumours, scandals, misrepresentations and misconceptions. This book offers a look at the secrets of our past royals. It is suitable for those interested in royal matters.

  • by Paul Feeney
    £5.99 - 13.99

    Do you remember washing in a tin bath by the fire, using outside lavatories and not having a television? Did you grow up in the 1950s and were you a teenager in the swinging sixties? If the Festival of Britain, food rationing and the Queen's coronation are among your earliest memories then you belong to the post-war baby boomer generation. How did we end up here, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, when it all just seems like yesterday? In this fascinating new trip down memory lane, Paul Feeney remembers what it has been like to live through the eventful second half of the twentieth century. This nostalgic journey through an era of change will resonate with anyone who began their innocent childhood years in austerity and has lived through a lifetime of ground-breaking events to the much changed Britain of today. There are also some wonderful pictures to help jog our memories of bygone days.

  • by Dermot Turing
    £6.49 - 8.99

  • by Alvin Nicholas
    £12.49

  • by Dan Cohn-Sherbok
    £9.49

    Anti-Semitism has featured in the history of Western civilisation since the Greeks. What the twentieth century has seen through the lens of the holocaust has been happening for over 3000 years. Dan Cohn-Sherbok traces the origins of anti-Semitism and its manifestations, from political opposition to racial persecution, Cohn-Sherbok describes Jewish emancipation from the late eighteenth century and its gradul transformation into the parallel political and nationalistic ideal of Zionism. This book offers a clear and readable account of why anti-Semitism has featured so strongly in world history and provides extensive discussion of the issues. Unlike most studies of the subject, it does not focus exclusively on Christian anti-Semitism, but explores the origins of Arab and organised communist anti-Semitism and Nazi racism. It is essential reading not only for history students and theologians, but anyone interested in finding out why the Jews have been hated and murdered.

  • by Paul Feeney
    £4.99

    Do you remember Pathe News? Taking the train to the seaside? The purple stains of iodine on the knees of boys in short trousers? Knitted bathing costumes? Then the chances are you were born in or around 1950. To the young people of today, the 1950s seem like another age. But for those born around then, this era of childhood feels like yesterday. This delightful collection of photographic memories will appeal to all who grew up in this post-war decade; they include pictures of children enjoying life out on the streets and bombsites, at home and at school, on holiday and at events. These wonderful period pictures and descriptive captions will bring back this decade of childhood, and jog memories about all aspects of life as it was in post-war Britain. Paul Feeney is the author of several bestselling nostalgia books including A 1950s Childhood and A 1960s Childhood (The History Press). He has also written the bestselling From Ration Book to Ebook (The History Press), which takes a nostalgic look back over the life and times of the post-war baby boomer generation.

  • by John Fox
    £9.49 - 13.99

    Using known and new evidence, John Fox provides the first biography of this extraordinary woman, a forgotten key player in the English Civil War.

  • by Alan Moss & Keith Skinner
    £13.99 - 19.49

    The secrets of Scotland Yard's famous Crime Museum revealed

  • by John Haldon
    £6.49 - 13.99

    The remarkable 1,000-year history of one of the world's greatest and most misunderstood empires.

  • by Charles Hadfield & Joseph Boughey
    £13.99 - 16.49

    The first edition of British Canals was published in 1950 and was much admired as a pioneering work in transport history. Joseph Boughey, with the advice of Charles Hadfield, has previously revised and updated the perennially popular material to reflect more recent changes. For this ninth edition, Joseph Boughey discusses the many new discoveries and advances in the world of canals around Britain, inevitably focussing on the twentieth century to a far greater extent than in any previous edition of this book, while still within the context of Hadfield's original work.

  • by Sheila Hardy
    £0.00 - 10.99

    Embarking on motherhood was a very different affair in the 1950s to what it is today. From how to dress baby (matinee coats and bonnets) to how to administer feeds (strictly four-hourly if following the Truby King method), the child-rearing methods of the 1950s are a fascinating insight into the lives of women in that decade. In The 1950s Mother author, mother and grandmother Sheila Hardy collects heart-warming personal anecdotes from those women, many of whom are now in their eighties, who became mothers during this fascinating post-war period. From the benefits of 'crying it out' and being put out in the garden to gripe water and Listen with Mother, the wisdom of mothers from the 1950s reverberates down the decades to young mothers of any generation and is a hilarious and, at times, poignant trip down memory lane for any mother or child of the 1950s.

  • by Mike Neville
    £14.99 - 18.49

    Who were Tubalcain, Jabal and Jubal and what is their significance for the Freemason? There is a general interest in the rituals of Freemasonry, generated in part by the apparently obscure references they contain. This is the only book that offers a guide to the stories used in Masonic ritual and their links to the Bible and Christianity. The new Mason is directed to a 'serious contemplation of the Volume of the Sacred Law' - but that is easier said than done without a grounding in the Scriptures, something that fewer and fewer people have. The historical and geographical setting of the Bible is explained here, making such contemplation easier for Mason and non-Mason alike. Mike Neville has systematically cross-referenced the most influential Chapters of the Bible to the ceremonies. It is his intention to get Freemasons to understand the ritual - not just to memorise and regurgitate - as well as to elucidate for the non-Mason. Sacred Secrets will aid the clergy, theologians and any other person interested in Freemasonry to see the links between ritual and scripture.

  • by Lucy Adlington
    £13.99 - 21.99

    Imagine 'stepping into someone else's shoes'. Walking back in time a century ago, which shoes would they be? A pair of silk sensations costing thousands of pounds designed by Yantonnay of Paris or wooden clogs with metal cleats that spark on the cobbles of a factory yard? Will your shoes be heavy with mud from trudging along duckboards between the tents of a frontline hospital... or stuck with tufts of turf from a football pitch? Will you be cloaked in green and purple, brandishing a 'Votes for Women' banner or will you be the height of respectability, restricted by your thigh-length corset? Great War Fashion opens the woman's wardrobe in the years before the outbreak of war to explore the real woman behind the stiff, mono-bosomed ideal of the Edwardian Society lady draped in gossamer gowns, and closes it on a new breed of women who have donned trousers and overalls to feed the nation's guns in munitions factories and who, clad in mourning, have loved and lost a whole generation of men. The journey through Great War Fashion is not just about the changing clothes and fashions of the war years, but much more than that - it is a journey into the lives of the women who lived under the shadow of war and were irrevocably changed by it. At times, laugh-out-loud funny and at others, bringing you to tears, Lucy Adlington paints a unique portrait of an inspiring generation of women, brought to life in rare and stunning images.

  • by Oliver Soden
    £10.99 - 16.99

    Jeoffry was a real cat who lived 250 years ago, confined to an asylum with Christopher Smart, one of the most visionary poets of the age. In exchange for love and companionship, Smart rewarded Jeoffry with the greatest tribute to a feline ever written. Prize-winning biographer Oliver Soden combines meticulous research with passages of dazzling invention to recount the life of the cat praised as 'a mixture of gravity and waggery'. The narrative roams from the theatres and bordellos of Covent Garden to the cell where Smart was imprisoned for mania. At once whimsical and profound, witty and deeply moving, Soden's biography plays with the genre like a cat with a toy. It tells the story of a poet and a poem, while setting Jeoffry's life and adventures against the roaring backdrop of eighteenth-century London.

  • by PENNELL STEPHEN
    £21.99

  • by Michelle Morgan
    £6.49 - 10.99

    Carole Lombard was the very opposite of the typical 1930s starlet. A no-nonsense woman, she worked hard, took no prisoners and had a great passion for life. As a result, she became Hollywood's highest-paid star. From the outside, Carole's life was one of great glamour and fun, yet privately she endured much heartache. As a child, her mother moved Carole and her brothers across the country away from their beloved father. Carole then began a film career, only to have it cut short after a devastating car accident. Picking herself back up, she was rocked by the accidental shooting of her lover; a failed marriage to actor William Powell; and the sorrow of infertility during her marriage to Hollywood's King, Clark Gable.Lombard marched forward, promising to be positive. Sadly her life was cut short in a plane crash so catastrophic that pieces of the aircraft are still buried in the mountain today. In Carole Lombard, bestselling author Michelle Morgan accesses previously unseen documents to tell the story of a woman whose remarkable life and controversial death continues to enthral.

  • by Robin Brown
    £6.49 - 10.99

    It is more than a thousand years since the exploitation of the elephant began. Alexander the Great used them, Hannibal took them over the Alps, and Kublai Khan encountered them in India. However, it is only the last hundred years that the existence of the African elephant has been threatened. Once the 'Great White Hunters' with their special elephant guns arrived, elephants in the south of the continent were decimated. 'Blood Ivory' tells the story of how the professional hunting fraternity were the first to realise the threat to the elephant and how they kick-started the whole conservation movement. It is not a story with a happy ending as a history of the conservation movement is essentially a tale of war - colonialists at war with traditional customs; newly-independent African countries at war with one another; poachers and smugglers at war with any kind of constraint; and international bodies fighting for the suppression of damaging information. Robin Brown paints a vivid picture of the impact of hunting on Africa's elephant population and the powerful personalities of those involved on both sides of the massacre - from Cecil Rhodes to Dennis Fitch-Hatton and Edward, Prince of Wales to David Sheldrick.

  • by Gemma Hollman
    £6.49 - 15.49

    Joan of Navarre was the richest woman in the land, at a time when war-torn England was penniless. Eleanor Cobham was the wife of a weak king's uncle - and her husband was about to fall from grace. Jacquetta Woodville was a personal enemy of Warwick the Kingmaker, who was about to take his revenge. Elizabeth Woodville was the widowed mother of a child king, fighting Richard III for her children's lives. In Royal Witches, Gemma Hollman explores the lives of these four unique women, looking at how rumours of witchcraft brought them to their knees in a time when superstition and suspicion was rife.

  • by Oliver Taylor
    £16.49

    An Illustrated History. Bath Abbey has the largest and strangest collection of over 1,500 church monuments in the UK. This is their story.

  • by John Ashdown-Hill
    £9.49 - 11.99

    The Last Days of Richard III contains a new and uniquely detailed exploration of Richard's last 150 days. By deliberately avoiding the hindsight knowledge that he will lose the Battle of Bosworth Field, we discover a new Richard: no passive victim, awaiting defeat and death, but a king actively pursuing his own agenda.It also re-examines the aftermath of Bosworth: the treatment of Richard's body; his burial; and the construction of his tomb. And there is the fascinating story of why, and how, Richard III's family tree was traced until a relative was found, alive and well, in Canada.Now, with the discovery of Richard's skeleton at the Greyfrairs Priory in Leicester, England, John Ashdown-Hill explains how his book inspired the dig and completes Richard III's fascinating story, giving details of how Richard died, and how the DNA link to a living relative of the king allowed the royal body to be identified.

  • by Cate Ludlow
    £5.99

  • by Linda Collins
    £9.49

    In a Reformation kingdom ill-used to queens, Elizabeth I needed a very particular image to hold her divided country together. The 'Cult of Gloriana' would elevate the queen to the status of a virgin goddess, aided by authors, musicians, and artists such as Spenser, Shakespeare, Hilliard, Tallis and Byrd. Her image was widely owned and distributed, thanks to the expansion of printing, and the English came to surpass their European counterparts in miniature painting, allowing courtiers to carry a likeness of their sovereign close to their hearts.Sumptuously illustrated, Gloriana: Elizabeth I and the Art of Queenship tells the story of Elizabethan art as a powerful device for royal magnificence and propaganda, illuminating several key artworks of Elizabeth's reign to create a portrait of the Tudor monarch as she has never been seen before.

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