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  • by GEMMA HOLLMAN
    £11.49

    From Joan of Navarre to Elizabeth Woodville. The first full exploration of the accusations of malicious witchcraft that plagued the lives of four royal women, and the Woodville line, for centuries

  • by CLARE HONEYFIELD
    £16.49

    A unique celebration of contemporary crafts around the Stroud Valleys, a beautiful book for lovers of the hand made.

  • by Dermot Turing
    £13.99

    The Life of the Man They Called Prof. The return of the high successful biography of a modern legend by Alan Turings nephew

  • by John Rhyder
    £17.99

    A Practical Celebration of the Tree. A guide to reconnecting with the art of using trees and timber for bushcraft and woodcraft

  • by DAVID GIBBINGS
    £11.49

    A Celebration of Westland at Yeovil. A glorious celebration of the history of Westland

  • by MAURO F. GUILL N
    £10.49

    How Todays Biggest Trends Will Collide and Reshape the Future of Everything. A ground-breaking analysis from one of the worlds foremost experts on global trends, including answers on how COVID-19 will amplify and accelerate each of these changes

  • by CLAIRE BRADBURY
    £14.99

    Finding Home in the City. We may have fallen out of love with our city homes, but cities are still going to be essential dwelling places for a growing population. International sustainability and wellbeing advocate, Claire Bradbury explores what we need to do to fall back in love with the city, and find our city homes again.

  • by RON GEESIN
    £12.99

    The Making of Pink Floyds Atom Heart Mother. Celebrating more than 50 years of the ground-breaking Atom Heart Mother

  • by Cate Ludlow
    £5.99

  • by DANIEL SMITH
    £11.99 - 18.99

    In July 1964, the Sunday Mirror ran a front-page story headlined: PEER AND A GANGSTER: YARD ENQUIRY. While the article withheld the names of the subjects, the newspaper reported that the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police had ordered an investigation into an alleged homosexual relationship between 'a household name' from the House of Lords and a leading figure in the London underworld. Lord Boothby was the Conservative lord in question, and Ronnie Kray the infamous gangster. The report threatened a scandal even more explosive than that of the Profumo affair the previous year. Yet within a couple of weeks the story had been killed off, vanishing as suddenly as it had appeared. Lord Boothby and the Krays carried on with business as usual. Now, for the first time the full saga of the cover-up and its far-reaching consequences can be revealed. Drawing upon recently released MI5 files, government papers, extensive interviews, and a wide array of contemporary reports and secondary sources, Daniel Smith pieces together how eminent figures from the political firmament, the Security Service, the Metropolitan Police, the legal profession and the media saw to it that the Sunday Mirror's story was crushed almost as soon as it emerged.

  • by George Drower
    £9.49 - 11.49

    The earliest record of an enclosed space around a homestead come from 10,000 BC and since then gardens of varying types and ambition have been popular throughout the ages. Whether ornamental patches surrounding wild cottages, container gardens blooming over unforgiving concrete or those turned over for growing produce, gardens exist in all shapes and sizes, in all manner of styles. Today we benefit from centuries of development, be it in the cultivation of desirable blossom or larger fruits, in the technology to keep weeds and lawn at bay or even in the visionaries who tore up rulebooks and cultivated pure creativity in their green spaces. George Drower takes fifty objects that have helped create the gardening scene we know today and explores the history outside spaces in a truly unique fashion. With stunning botanical and archive images, this lavish volume is essential for garden lovers.

  • - Spitfire Heroines of the Air Transport Auxiliary
    by JACKY HYAMS
    £9.49

    Through the darkest days of the Second World War, an elite group of courageous, gifted women risked their lives as courier pilots, flying Lancaster Bombers, Spitfires and many other aircraft in hundreds of perilous missions across the country. The role of these women pilots of the Air Transport Auxiliary was to deliver the planes to the male RAF pilots who would take them into battle, dangerous work which the women carried out unarmed, without radios. Fifteen would lose their lives. In The Female Few, five of these astonishingly brave women tell their stories for the first time, awe inspiring tales of incredible risk, tenacity and sacrifice. Their spirit and fearlessness in the face of death still resonates down the years, and their accounts reveal a forgotten chapter in the history of the Second World War. As Yvonne Macdonald, now 90 and living in Cape Cod, says: 'It was a kind of freedom you never get any other way, it was as if you had wings sewn on your back. A lot of people here in Cape Cod don't even know I was in World War Two. Or what I did.' They do now.

  • by Siobhan Ferguson
    £9.49

  • by Kathryn Warner
    £9.99 - 11.49

    Traditionally, the Wars of the Roses - one of the bloodiest conflicts on English soil - began in 1455, when the Duke of York attacked King Henry VI's army in the narrow streets of St Albans. But this conflict did not spring up overnight.Blood Roses traces it back to the beginning.Starting in 1245 with the founding of the House of Lancaster, Kathryn Warner follows a twisted path of political intrigue, bloody war and fascinating characters for 200 years. From the Barons Wars to the overthrowing of Edward II, Eleanor of Castile to Isabella of France, and true love to Loveday, this is a new look at an infamous era. The first book to look at the origins of both houses, Blood Roses reframes some of the biggest events of the medieval era; not as stand-alone conflicts, but as part of a long-running family feud that would have drastic consequences.

  • - Exploration and Death in the Antarctic
    by Stephen Haddelsey
    £6.49 - 11.49

    EVER since Captain Cook first sailed into the Great Southern Ocean in 1773, mankind has sought to push back the boundaries of Antarctic exploration. The first expeditions tried simply to chart Antarctica's coastline, but then the Sixth International Geographical Congress of 1895 posed a greater challenge: the conquest of the continent itself. Though the loss of Captain Scott's Polar Party remains the most famous, many of the resulting expeditions suffered fatalities. Some men drowned; others fell into bottomless crevasses; many died in catastrophic fires; a few went mad; and yet more froze to death. Modern technology increased the pace of exploration, but aircraft and motor vehicles introduced entirely new dangers. For the first time, Icy Graves uses the tragic tales not only of famous explorers like Robert Falcon Scott and Aeneas Mackintosh but also of many lesser-known figures, both British and international, to plot the forward progress of Antarctic exploration. It tells, often in their own words, the compelling stories of the brave men and women who have fallen in what Sir Ernest Shackleton called the 'White Warfare of the South'.

  • - The Indian Wars and the Conquest of the West
    by Mark Felton
    £9.49

    Blood, guts, dust and hatred: the real history of the American West. Today is a Good Day to Fight covers the period from the initial penetration of the region by settlers and prospectors in the 1840s until the end of the Indian Wars in the 1890s. It explains the history of white-Indian conflict from the military point of view, showing how the United States used its army to wage terrible wars of conquest upon Native American peoples in order to take the land from them and enrich the growing nation, and how the Indians never really stood a chance in trying to defend their homelands. Highlighting the fractious and bitter relations between tribes unable and unwilling to unite in time to stave off their common enemy, it tries to portray the utter bitterness of the conflict between white and Indian, and how both sides resorted to increasingly foul acts of war and slaughter as the conflict progressed. A dirty, underhanded and scrappy conflict, the outrages committed by both sides fuelled bitterness and resentment that still exists in America today.

  • - And 49 Other Ideas that Never Took Off
    by James Moore & Paul Nero
    £11.99

    During the Second World War, an American behavioural psychologist working with pigeons discovered that the birds could be trained to recognise an object and to peck at an image of it; when loaded into the nose-cone of a missile, these pecks could be translated into adjustments to the guidance fins, steering the projectile to its target. Pigeon-Guided Missiles reveals this and other fascinating tales of daring plans from history destined to change the world we live in, yet which ended in failure, or even disaster. Some became the victims of the eccentric figures behind them, others succumbed to financial and political misfortune, and a few were just too far ahead of their time. Discover why the great groundnut scheme cost British taxpayers GBP49 million, why the bid to build Minerva, a whole new country in the Pacific Ocean, sank, and why the first Channel Tunnel (started in 1881, over a century before the one we know today) hit a dead end.

  • by Kerstin Lucker & Ute Daenschel
    £4.49

    A retelling of global history which reinstates women to their rightful place in the story, without excluding men from the narrative

  • - From Glam Rock to Happy Days
    by Derek Tait
    £4.99

    Do you remember glam rock, flares, cheesecloth shirts and chopper bikes? Then it sounds like you were lucky enough to grow up during the 1970s. Who could forget all the glam rock bands of that era, like Slade, Wizard, Mud and Sweet, or singers like Alvin Stardust, Marc Bolan and David Bowie? What about those wonderful TV shows like Starsky and Hutch, Kojak, Kung Fu and Happy Days? Fashion included platform shoes (we all had a pair), flared trousers, brightly patterned shirts with huge collars and colourful kipper ties. And everyone remembers preparing for power cuts and that long, hot summer of 1976. So dust off your space hopper and join us on this fascinating journey through a childhood during the seventies, with hilarious illustrations and a nostalgic trip down memory lane for all those who grew up in this memorable decade. Derek Tait has written over a dozen books, most of them about his early childhood in Singapore or the area of Plymouth in which he lives. He is now a full-time writer, but previous jobs have included a photographer and a cartoonist.

  • by Ruth Ive
    £5.99 - 9.99

    During the second World War, the only way Winston Churchill and Franklin D Roosevelt could communicate was through a top secret transatlantic telephone link. Ruth Ive, a young stenographer working in the Ministry of Information, had the job of censoring the line. This title describes the details of her story.

  • - The Woman Who Saved Millions from Thalidomide
    by James Essinger & Sandra Koutzenko
    £11.99

    The story of the one woman who, against all odds, stopped Thalidomide in its tracks because it poisoned a nation

  • - Flying the World in the 1980s
    by Gretchen Ryan
    £6.99

    A funny, entertaining and frank account of life as an air hostess in the debauched days of the 1980s

  • by Neil Thomas
    £13.99

    Re-fight some of the bloodiest battles of the ancient and medieval worlds! Seasoned wargamer and author Neil Thomas brings historical perspective to the hobby with a description and interpretation of significant military developments from 3,000BC to AD1500. Wargaming is the simulation of accurate historical battles using miniature figures to fight over three dimensional terrain, their movement and combat being regulated by clearly defined rules. Neil Thomas' new book provides specific coverage of ancient and medieval wargaming, thanks to its division into biblical, classical, Dark Age and medieval sections. Each section has its own set of rules and much expanded army lists. The wargamer gains additional perspective from data panels containing facts about weaponry, personalities and chroniclers, and quotations from original document sources. Useful suggestions for further reading are also included, while battle reports in each section provide tactical insights for both novice and veteran wargamers.

  • by Alec Forshaw
    £6.49

    It is said that, however long you live, and however far you travel, the streets and fields where you played as a child will always be home to you. So Cambridge is for Alec Forshaw. This is a story of a childhood in Cambridge in the 1950s and '60s, followed by three undergraduate years and three decades of frequent and regular visits until the ties of the parental home were broken. These are memories set down before they too disappear and they recall a Cambridge which for many will have faded. Those who have read Gwen Raverat's Period Piece: A Cambridge Childhood will have seen in her description of the town and its society a different world. The reminiscences herein may rekindle more recent recollections, or simply entertain and amuse.

  • by John Ashdown-Hill
    £8.99 - 11.99

    The Last Days of Richard III contains a new and uniquely detailed exploration of Richard's last 150 days. By deliberately avoiding the hindsight knowledge that he will lose the Battle of Bosworth Field, we discover a new Richard: no passive victim, awaiting defeat and death, but a king actively pursuing his own agenda.It also re-examines the aftermath of Bosworth: the treatment of Richard's body; his burial; and the construction of his tomb. And there is the fascinating story of why, and how, Richard III's family tree was traced until a relative was found, alive and well, in Canada.Now, with the discovery of Richard's skeleton at the Greyfrairs Priory in Leicester, England, John Ashdown-Hill explains how his book inspired the dig and completes Richard III's fascinating story, giving details of how Richard died, and how the DNA link to a living relative of the king allowed the royal body to be identified.

  • by Robert Pike
    £11.99

    'Based on eye-witness accounts, Robert Pike's moving book vividly depicts the lives of the villagers who were caught up in the tragedy of Oradour-sur-Glane and brings their experiences to our attention for the first time' Hanna Diamond, author of Fleeing HitlerOn 10 June 1944, four days after Allied forces landed in Normandy, the picturesque village of Oradour-sur-Glane in the rural heart of France was destroyed by an armoured SS Panzer division. Six hundred and forty-three men, women and children were murdered in the nation's worst wartime atrocity. Today, Oradour is remembered as a 'martyred village' and its ruins preserved, but the stories of its inhabitants lie buried under the rubble of the intervening decades. Silent Village gathers the powerful testimonies of survivors in the first account of Oradour as it was both before the tragedy and in its aftermath. Why this peaceful community was chosen for extermination has remained a mystery. Putting aside contemporary hearsay, Nazi rhetoric and revisionist theories, Robert Pike returns to the archival evidence to narrate the tragedy as it truly happened - and give voice to the anguish of those left behind.

  • by Adam Morgan Ibbotson
    £11.99

    Cumbria is a land built from stone. Whether it is Hadrian's Wall, Kendal Castle or the beautiful fells of the Lake District - for thousands of years people have found a certain elegance and utility in stone. Nestled amongst these common relics are a multitude of massive stone monuments, built over 3,000 years before British shores were ever touched by Roman sandals. Cumbria's 'megalithic' monuments are among Europe's greatest and best-preserved ancient relics but are often poorly understood and rarely visited.Cumbria's Prehistoric Monuments aims to dispel the idea that these stones are merely 'mysterious'. Instead, within this book you will find credible answers, using up-to-date research, excavation notes, maps and diagrams to explore one of Britain's richest archaeological landscapes. Featuring stunning original photography and newly illustrated diagrams of every megalithic site in the county, Adam Morgan Ibbotson invites you to take a journey into a land sculpted by ancient hands.

  • - The Shaun Goater Story
    by David Clayton & Shaun Goater
    £5.99

    Shaun Goater was signed by Alex Ferguson almost as a political pawn after a Manchester United tour of Bermuda went disastrously wrong. He never made it with United and instead moved on to Rotherham. Undeterred by homesickness and the Yorkshire weather, he became a huge favourite at Millmoor before moving to Bristol City, where his goalscoring exploits endeared him to the fans and caught the eye of Man City manager Joe Royle. He won over the doubters at City, who had seen him only as a journeyman striker bought to plug a gap. Within a year, he'd become a cult figure and his knack of poaching goals soon gave rise to one of the best modern-day terrace chants 'Feed the Goat and he will score'. Season after season, the bond between player and supporters grew and his name was etched into City folklore. He was captain for their last match at Maine Road before joining Reading. His career stalled with the Royals when manager Alan Pardew left a few weeks after Goater's arrival and Steve Coppell took over. He went out on loan to Coventry before Southend United rescued him at the start of their highly successful 2005/06 season.

  • - Setting the Record Straight
    by NICK JOHNSON & Peter Swan
    £9.49

    England appearances, a courtroom drama and a spell in prison were just the start. He later returned to Sheffield Wednesday's first team before going into management and guiding Matlock town to the FA Trophy, but since retiring he has faced an increasing battle with Alzheimers. Setting the Record Straight lifts the lid on what was termed 'the biggest sports scandal of the century' and all that happened afterwards for this outstanding footballer.

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