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  • - The King and Queen of Italian Wine
    by Kerin O'Keefe
    £27.49

    Following on the success of her books on Brunello di Montalcino, renowned author and wine critic Kerin O'Keefe takes readers on a historic and in-depth journey to discover Barolo and Barbaresco, two of Italy's most fascinating and storied wines. In this groundbreaking new book, O'Keefe gives a comprehensive overview of the stunning side-by-side growing areas of these two world-class wines that are separated only by the city of Alba and profiles a number of the fiercely individualistic winemakers who create structured yet elegant and complex wines of remarkable depth from Italy's most noble grape, Nebbiolo. A masterful narrator of the aristocratic origins of winemaking in this region, O'Keefe gives readers a clear picture of why Barolo is called both the King of Wines and the Wine of Kings. Profiles of key Barolo and Barbaresco villages include fascinating stories of the families, wine producers, and idiosyncratic personalities that have shaped the area and its wines and helped ignite the Quality Wine Revolution that eventually swept through all of Italy. The book also considers practical factors impacting winemaking in this region, including climate change, destructive use of harsh chemicals in the vineyards versus the gentler treatments used for centuries, the various schools of thought regarding vinification and aging, and expansion and zoning of vineyard areas. Readers will also appreciate a helpful vintage guide to Barolo and Barbaresco and a glossary of useful Italian wine terms.

  • - The Search for Tuscany's Noblest Wine
    by Bill Nesto & Frances Di Savino
    £27.49

    ';An important new book on Chianti Classico: Winners of the Andre Simon 2013 award for their bookThe World of Sicilian Wine, Nesto and Di Savino have produced the investigative, scholarly and detailed book that Chianti Classico has long deserved. Nesto and Di Savino are brilliant historic investigators. . . . A must-read for anyone seriously interested in wine.'Walter Speller,JancisRobinson.com This book tells the story of the ancient land named Chianti and the modern wine appellation known as Chianti Classico. In 1716, Tuscany's penultimate Medici ruler, Cosimo III, anointed the region of Chianti, along with three smaller areas in the Florentine State, as the world's first legal appellations of origin for wine. In the succeeding centuries, this milestone was all but forgotten. By the late nineteenth century, the name Chianti, rather than signifying this historic region and its celebrated wine, identified a simple Italian red table wine in a straw-covered flask. In the twenty-first century, Chianti Classico emerged as one of Italy's most dynamic and fashionable wine zones. Chianti Classico relates the fascinating evolution of Chianti as a wine region and reveals its geographic and cultural complexity. Bill Nesto, MW, and Frances Di Savino explore the townships of Chianti Classico and introduce readers to the modern-day winegrowers who are helping to transform the region. The secrets of Sangiovese, the principal vine variety of Chianti, are also revealed as the book unlocks the myths and mysteries of one of Italy's most storied wine regions. The publication of Chianti Classico coincides with the three hundredth anniversary of the Medici decree delimiting the region of Chianti on September 24, 1716.

  • by Dieter Braatz, Ulrich Sautter & Ingo Swoboda
    £40.99

    Featuring sixty-seven exceptional color maps as well as eighty-seven vivid images by photographer Hendrik Holler and others, this is the most comprehensive and up-to-date atlas of German wine-a detailed reference to vineyards and appellations. The authors explain the geography of all the German wine-growing regions and provide independent analysis and ranking of the most significant vineyards in each region. In addressing the growing American appreciation of German wines, the atlas pays in-depth attention to Rieslings from the Mosel and other premier regions while also acquainting readers with wines from less familiar areas such as the Ahr, Baden, the Taubertal, and Franconia. Beautifully produced, with helpful sidebars and succinct essays, this book will become the standard reference on the subject.

  • - Mysterious Creatures of Japanese Folklore
    by Michael Dylan Foster
    £21.99 - 56.49

    Monsters, ghosts, fantastic beings, and supernatural phenomena of all sorts haunt the folklore and popular culture of Japan. Broadly labeled yokai, these creatures come in infinite shapes and sizes, from tengu mountain goblins and kappa water spirits to shape-shifting foxes and long-tongued ceiling-lickers. Currently popular in anime, manga, film, and computer games, many yokai originated in local legends, folktales, and regional ghost stories. Drawing on years of research in Japan, Michael Dylan Foster unpacks the history and cultural context of yokai, tracing their roots, interpreting their meanings, and introducing people who have hunted them through the ages. In this delightful and accessible narrative, readers will explore the roles played by these mysterious beings within Japanese culture and will also learn of their abundance and variety through detailed entries, some with original illustrations, on more than fifty individual creatures. The Book of Yokai provides a lively excursion into Japanese folklore and its ever-expanding influence on global popular culture. It also invites readers to examine how people create, transmit, and collect folklore, and how they make sense of the mysteries in the world around them. By exploring yokai as a concept, we can better understand broader processes of tradition, innovation, storytelling, and individual and communal creativity.

  • - Understanding and Appreciating One of Italy's Greatest Wines
    by Kerin O'Keefe
    £29.99

    For fans of Italian wine, few names command the level of respect accorded to Brunello di Montalcino. Expert wine writer Kerin O'Keefe has a deep personal knowledge of Tuscany and its extraordinary wine, and her account is both thoroughly researched and readable. Organized as a guided tour through Montalcino's geography, this essential reference also makes sense of Brunello's complicated history, from its rapid rise to the negative and positive effects of the 2008 grape-blending scandal dubbed "e;Brunellogate."e; O'Keefe also provides in-depth profiles of nearly sixty leading producers of Brunello.

  • - Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer
    by Paul Schrader
    £21.99

  • - A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variability
    by Jack Halberstam
    £14.49

    In the last decade, public discussions of transgender issues have increased exponentially. This book explores the recent shifts in the meaning of the gendered body and representation, and explores the possibilities of a non-gendered, gender optional, or gender-hacked future.

  • - Commercialization of Human Feeling
    by Arlie Russell Hochschild
    £29.99

    In private life, we try to induce or suppress love, envy, and anger through deep acting or "e;emotion work,"e; just as we manage our outer expressions of feeling through surface acting. In trying to bridge a gap between what we feel and what we "e;ought"e; to feel, we take guidance from "e;feeling rules"e; about what is owing to others in a given situation. Based on our private mutual understandings of feeling rules, we make a "e;gift exchange"e; of acts of emotion management. We bow to each other not simply from the waist, but from the heart.But what occurs when emotion work, feeling rules, and the gift of exchange are introduced into the public world of work? In search of the answer, Arlie Russell Hochschild closely examines two groups of public-contact workers: flight attendants and bill collectors. The flight attendant's job is to deliver a service and create further demand for it, to enhance the status of the customer and be "e;nicer than natural."e; The bill collector's job is to collect on the service, and if necessary, to deflate the status of the customer by being "e;nastier than natural."e; Between these extremes, roughly one-third of American men and one-half of American women hold jobs that call for substantial emotional labor. In many of these jobs, they are trained to accept feeling rules and techniques of emotion management that serve the company's commercial purpose.Just as we have seldom recognized or understood emotional labor, we have not appreciated its cost to those who do it for a living. Like a physical laborer who becomes estranged from what he or she makes, an emotional laborer, such as a flight attendant, can become estranged not only from her own expressions of feeling (her smile is not "e;her"e; smile), but also from what she actually feels (her managed friendliness). This estrangement, though a valuable defense against stress, is also an important occupational hazard, because it is through our feelings that we are connected with those around us.On the basis of this book, Hochschild was featured in Key Sociological Thinkers, edited by Rob Stones. This book was also the winner of the Charles Cooley Award in 1983, awarded by the American Sociological Association and received an honorable mention for the C. Wright Mills Award.

  • by Ian D'Agata
    £33.99

    The definitive reference book on the myriad crus and the grand cru wine production areas of Italy's native wine grapes--an ideal complement to D'Agata's previous award-winning Native Wine Grapes of Italy.y.

  • - A Natural History of the World's Most Captivating Birds
    by Catherine A. Toft & Timothy F. Wright
    £27.49

    Parrots of the Wildis an exhaustive compendium of information about parrots, from their evolutionary history to their behavior to present-day conservation issues. A must-have for anyone interested in these amazing creatures. Irene M. Pepperberg, Professor at Harvard University and author ofAlex & Me: How a Scientist and a Parrot Discovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligenceand Formed a Deep Bond in the Process If you like parrots then youll love this book. From their evolutionary past to their modern-day love lives,Parrots of the Wildpresents a suitably captivating read. I thought I knew a lot about parrots--until I delved into these pages.Tony Juniper, author ofWhat Has Nature Ever Done for Us?andSpix's Macaw: The Race to Save the World's Rarest BirdParrots of the Wild explores recent scientific discoveries and what they reveal about the lives of wild parrots, which are among the most intelligent and rarest of birds. Catherine A. Toft and Tim Wright discuss the evolutionary history of parrots and how this history affects perceptual and cognitive abilities, diet and foraging patterns, and mating and social behavior. The authors also discuss conservation status and the various ways different populations are adapting to a world that is rapidly changing. The book focuses on general patterns across the 350-odd species of parrots, as well as what can be learned from interesting exceptions to these generalities. A synthetic account of the diversity and ecology of wild parrots, this book distills knowledge from the authors' own research and from their review of more than 2,400 published scientific studies. The book is enhanced by an array of illustrations, including nearly ninety color photos of wild parrots represented in their natural habitats. Parrots of the Wild melds scientific exploration with features directed at the parrot enthusiast to inform and delight a broad audience.

  • - Understanding, Protecting, and Nurturing an Infant through the First Three Months
    by Susan Brink
    £21.99

    The first three months of a baby's life is an outside-the-uterus period of intense development, a biological bridge from fetal life to preparation for the real world. The fourth trimester has more in common with the nine months that came before than with the lifetime that follows. This comprehensive, intimate, and much-needed "e;operating manual"e; for newborns presents a new paradigm of a baby's early life that shifts our focus and alters our priorities. Combining the latest scientific findings with real-life stories and experiences, Susan Brink examines critical dimensions of newborn development such as eating and nutrition, bonding and attachment, sleep patterns, sensory development, pain and pleasure, and the creation of foundations for future advancement. Brink offers well-informed, practical information and the reasons behind her advice so that parents and caretakers can make their own decisions about how to care for a newborn during this crucial period. The Fourth Trimester assures readers that infants are as biologically capable as they are physically helpless. They thrive on what is readily available in every household: consistent, loving attention.

  • - Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic
    by Lisa Stevenson
    £21.99

    In Life Beside Itself, Lisa Stevenson takes us on a haunting ethnographic journey through two historical moments when life for the Canadian Inuit has hung in the balance: the tuberculosis epidemic (1940s to the early 1960s) and the subsequent suicide epidemic (1980s to the present). Along the way, Stevenson troubles our commonsense understanding of what life is and what it means to care for the life of another. Through close attention to the images in which we think and dream and through which we understand the world, Stevenson describes a world in which life is beside itself: the name-soul of a teenager who dies in a crash lives again in his friend's newborn baby, a young girl shares a last smoke with a dead friend in a dream, and the possessed hands of a clock spin uncontrollably over its face. In these contexts, humanitarian policies make little sense because they attempt to save lives by merely keeping a body alive. For the Inuit, and perhaps for all of us, life is "e;somewhere else,"e; and the task is to articulate forms of care for others that are adequate to that truth.

  • by Clive Coates
    £46.49

    Details major vintages from 2006 back to 1959 and includes thousands of tasting notes of the top wines. This book contains chapters on Chablis and Cote Chalonnaise. It considers Burgundy to be one of the most exciting, complex, and intractable wine region in the world.

  • - Perspective and Method
    by Herbert Blumer
    £19.49

    A collection of articles dealing with the point of view of symbolic interactionism and with the topic of methodology in the discipline of sociology. It presents what might be regarded as an authoritative statement of its point of view, outlining its fundamental premises and sketching their implications for sociological study.

  • - The Collected Writings
    by Robert Smithson
    £30.99

    This volume includes previously unpublished essays by Robert Smithson and gathers articles, interviews and photographs as well as a catalogue of the books in Smithson's library. Together they provide a picture of his wide-ranging views on art and culture.

  • - A Global History of America's Endless Conflicts, from Columbus to the Islamic State
    by David Vine
    £19.49 - 21.99

  • - The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat
    by Robert N. & III Spengler
    £19.49

  • - The Life and Legacy of Dexter Gordon
    by Maxine Gordon
    £15.49

    Sophisticated Giant presents the life and legacy of tenor saxophonist Dexter Gordon (19231990), one of the major innovators of modern jazz. In a context of biography, history, and memoir, Maxine Gordon has completed the book that her late husband began, weaving his ';solo' turns with her voice and a chorus of voices from past and present. Reading like a jazz composition, the blend of research, anecdote, and a selection of Dexter's personal letters reflects his colorful life and legendary times. It is clear why the celebrated trumpet genius Dizzy Gillespie said to Dexter, ';Man, you ought to leave your karma to science.' Dexter Gordon the icon is the Dexter beloved and celebrated on albums, on film, and in jazz lore--even in a street named for him in Copenhagen. But this image of the cool jazzman fails to come to terms with the multidimensional man full of humor and wisdom, a figure who struggled to reconcile being both a creative outsider who broke the rules and a comforting insider who was a son, father, husband, and world citizen. This essential book is an attempt to fill in the gaps created by our misperceptions as well as the gaps left by Dexter himself.

  • - Complete and Unabridged
    by Luo Guanzhong
    £24.49

    Tells the story of the fateful last reign of the Han dynasty (206 BC - AD 220), when the Chinese empire was divided into three warring kingdoms. This title offers a view of how power is wielded, how diplomacy is conducted, and how wars are planned and fought.

  • - The Architecture of Past and Present
    by Daniel Lord Smail & Andrew Shryock
    £21.99

    Humans have always been interested in their origins, but historians have been reluctant to write about the long stretches of time before the invention of writing. In fact, the deep past was left out of most historical writing almost as soon as it was discovered. This breakthrough book, as important for readers interested in the present as in the past,brings science into history to offer a dazzling new vision of humanity across time. Team-written by leading experts in a variety of fields, it maps events, cultures, and eras across millions of years to present a new scale for understanding the human body, energy and ecosystems, language, food, kinship, migration, and more. Combining cutting-edge social and evolutionary theory with the latest discoveries about human genes, brains, and material culture, Deep History invites scholars and general readers alike to explore the dynamic of connectedness that spans all of human history.With Timothy Earle, Gillian Feeley-Harnik, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, Clive Gamble, April McMahon, John C. Mitani, Hendrik Poinar, Mary C. Stiner, and Thomas R. Trautmann

  • by Oretta Zanini De Vita
    £19.49

    Spaghetti, gnocchi, tagliatellea, ravioli, vincisgrassi, strascinati-pasta in its myriad forms has been a staple of the Mediterranean diet longer than bread. This beautiful volume is the first book to provide a complete history of pasta in Italy, telling its long story via the extravagant variety of shapes it takes and the even greater abundance of names by which it is known. Food scholar Oretta Zanini De Vita traveled to every corner of her native Italy, recording oral histories, delving into long-forgotten family cookbooks, and searching obscure archives to produce this rich and uniquely personal compendium of historical and geographical information. For each entry she includes the primary ingredients, preparation techniques, variant names, and the locality where it is made and eaten. Along the way, Zanini De Vita debunks such culinary myths as Marco Polo's supposed role in pasta's story even as she serves up a feast of new information. Encyclopedia of Pasta, illustrated throughout with original drawings by Luciana Marini, will be the standard reference on one of the world's favorite foods for many years to come, engaging and delighting both general readers and food professionals.

  • - A History
    by Rod Phillips
    £21.99 - 24.49

    A fascinating book that belongs on every wine lover's bookshelf.The Wine EconomistIt's a book to read for its unstoppable torrent of fascinating and often surprising details.Andrew Jefford,Decanter For centuries, wine has been associated with France more than with any other country. France remains one of the world's leading wine producers by volume and enjoys unrivaled cultural recognition for its wine. If any wine regions are global household names, they are French regions such as Champagne, Bordeaux, and Burgundy. Within the wine world, products from French regions are still benchmarks for many wines. French Wine is the first synthetic history of wine in France: from Etruscan, Greek, and Roman imports and the adoption of wine by beer-drinking Gauls to its present status within the global marketplace. Rod Phillips places the history of grape growing and winemaking in each of the country's major regions within broad historical and cultural contexts. Examining a range of influences on the wine industry, wine trade, and wine itself, the book explores religion, economics, politics, revolution, and war, as well as climate and vine diseases. French Wine is the essential reference on French wine for collectors, consumers, sommeliers, and industry professionals.

  • by Ian D'Agata
    £33.99

    Mountainous terrain, volcanic soils, innumerable microclimates, and an ancient culture of winemaking influenced by Greeks, Phoenicians, and Romans make Italy the most diverse country in the world of wine. This diversity is reflected in the fact that Italy grows the largest number of native wine grapes known, amounting to more than a quarter of the world's commercial wine grape types. Ian D'Agata spent thirteen years interviewing producers, walking vineyards, studying available research, and tasting wines to create this authoritative guide to Italy's native grapes and their wines. Writing with great enthusiasm and deep knowledge, D'Agata discusses more than five hundred different native Italian grape varieties, from Aglianico to Zibibbo. D'Agata provides details about how wine grapes are identified and classified, what clones are available, which soils are ideal, and what genetic evidence tells us about a variety's parentage. He gives historical and anecdotal accounts of each grape variety and describes the characteristics of wines made from the grape. A regional list of varieties and a list of the best producers provide additional guidance. Comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and engaging, this book is the perfect companion for anyone who wants to know more about the vast enological treasures cultivated in Italy.

  • by Charles Tilly
    £22.99

    Charles Tilly, in this eloquent manifesto, presents a powerful new approach to the study of persistent social inequality. How, he asks, do long-lasting, systematic inequalities in life chances arise, and how do they come to distinguish members of different socially defined categories of persons? Exploring representative paired and unequal categories, such as male/female, black/white, and citizen/noncitizen, Tilly argues that the basic causes of these and similar inequalities greatly resemble one another. In contrast to contemporary analyses that explain inequality case by case, this account is one of process. Categorical distinctions arise, Tilly says, because they offer a solution to pressing organizational problems. Whatever the "e;organization"e; is-as small as a household or as large as a government-the resulting relationship of inequality persists because parties on both sides of the categorical divide come to depend on that solution, despite its drawbacks. Tilly illustrates the social mechanisms that create and maintain paired and unequal categories with a rich variety of cases, mapping out fertile territories for future relational study of durable inequality.

  • - An Essay on the Selection of Technological and Environmental Dangers
    by Mary Douglas & Aaron Wildavsky
    £21.99

    Can we know the risks we face, now or in the future? No, we cannot; but yes, we must act as if we do. Some dangers are unknown; others are known, but not by us because no one person can know everything. Most people cannot be aware of most dangers at most times. Hence, no one can calculate precisely the total risk to be faced. How, then, do people decide which risks to take and which to ignore? On what basis are certain dangers guarded against and others relegated to secondary status? This book explores how we decide what risks to take and which to ignore, both as individuals and as a culture.

  • by Cole Swensen
    £19.49

    These poems are about gardens, particularly the seventeenth-century French baroque gardens designed by the father of the form, Andre Le Notre. While the poems focus on such examples as Versailles, which Le Notre created for Louis XIV, they also explore the garden as metaphor. Using the imagery of the garden, Cole Swensen considers everything from human society to the formal structure of poetry. She looks in particular at the concept of public versus private property, asking who actually owns a garden? A gentle irony accompanies the question because in French, the phrase "e;le notre"e; means "e;ours."e; Whereas all of Le Notre's gardens were designed and built for the aristocracy, today most are public parks. Swensen probes the two senses of "e;le notre"e; to discover where they intersect, overlap, or blur.

  • - How to Keep Your Cool on a Warming Planet
    by Sarah Jaquette Ray
    £13.99

  • by A.Starker Leopold
    £22.99

  • by Frank O'Hara
    £24.99

    Reflects the poet's growth as an artist from the earliest dazzling, experimental verses that he began writing in the late 1940s to the years before his accidental death at forty, when his poems became increasingly individual and reflective.

  • - The Ten Mahavidyas
    by David Kinsley
    £22.99

    The Hindu pantheon is rich in images of the divine feminine - deities representing a wide range of symbolic, social, and meditative meanings. This book documents a highly unusual group of ten Hindu tantric goddesses, the Mahavidyas, many of whom are strongly associated with sexuality and violence.

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