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  • by Thomas Piketty
    £26.99

    Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century showed that capitalism, left to itself, generates deepening inequality. In this audacious follow-up, he challenges us to revolutionize how we think about ideology and history, exposing the ideas that have sustained inequality since premodern times and outlining a fairer economic system.

  • by Thomas Piketty
    £18.49 - 28.99

    The main driver of inequality--returns on capital that exceed the rate of economic growth--is again threatening to generate extreme discontent and undermine democratic values. Thomas Piketty's findings in this ambitious, original, rigorous work will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.

  • by Peter C. Brown
    £23.99

    Drawing on cognitive psychology and other fields, Make It Stick offers techniques for becoming more productive learners, and cautions against study habits and practice routines that turn out to be counterproductive. The book speaks to students, teachers, trainers, athletes, and all those interested in lifelong learning and self-improvement.

  • - Why Our Freedom is in Danger and How to Save it
    by Yascha Mounk
    £0.00 - 16.49

    From India to Turkey, from Poland to the United States, authoritarian populists have seized power. Two core components of liberal democracy individual rights and the popular will are at war, putting democracy itself at risk. In plain language, Yascha Mounk describes how we got here, where we need to go, and why there is little time left to waste.

  • - The Future of the System That Rules the World
    by Branko Milanovic
    £0.00 - 15.99

    For the first time in history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. Capitalism prevails because it delivers prosperity and meets desires for autonomy. But it also is unstable and morally defective. Surveying the varieties and futures of capitalism, Branko Milanovic offers creative solutions to improve a system that isn't going anywhere.

  • - Original Edition
    by John Rawls
    £29.99

    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of John Rawls's view, much of the extensive literature on his theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes it once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawls's work.

  • by Walter Benjamin
    £23.49 - 25.99

    Collected here are "Franz Kafka," "Karl Kraus," and "The Author as Producer," the meditation "A Berlin Chronicle," discussions of photography and the French writer, and previously untranslated pieces on such subjects as language and memory, theological criticism and literary history, astrology and the newspaper, Valery, Hitler, and Mickey Mouse.

  • - Wealth Managers and the One Percent
    by Brooke Harrington
    £16.49 - 38.99

    How do the one percent keep getting richer despite financial crises and the myriad of taxes on income, capital gains, and inheritance? Brooke Harrington interviewed professionals who specialize in protecting the fortunes of the world's richest people: wealth managers. To gain access to their tactics and mentality, she trained to become one of them.

  • - Gender Equality by Design
    by Iris Bohnet
    £15.99 - 23.49

    Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back and de-biasing minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution. Iris Bohnet shows that by de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts-often at low cost and high speed.

  • by Cicero

    We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic.

  • by Timothy Morton
    £18.99

    Argues that various forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh and this interconnectedness penetrates different dimensions of life. This title investigates the profound philosophical, political, and aesthetic implications of the fact that these life forms are interconnected.

  • by Edward O. Wilson & Bert Hoelldobler
    £111.49

    This landmark work is a thoroughgoing survey of one of the largest and most diverse groups of animals on the planet. Hoelldobler and Wilson review in exhaustive detail virtually all topics in the anatomy, physiology, social organization, ecology, and natural history of the ants.

  • by Charles Taylor
    £20.49 - 41.99

    The place of religion in society has changed profoundly in the last few centuries, particularly in the West. In what will be a defining book for our time, Taylor takes up the question of what these changes mean, and what, precisely, happens when a society becomes one in which faith is only one human possibility among others.

  • - Reading Edition
    by Emily Dickinson
    £23.49 - 187.99

    Franklin, the foremost scholar of Dickinson's manuscripts, has prepared an authoritative one-volume edition of all extant poems by Emily Dickinson-1,789 poems in all, the largest number ever assembled-rendered with Dickinson's spelling, punctuation, and capitalization intact.

  • - Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age
    by Donna Zuckerberg
    £15.99

    Some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online, where alt-right men's groups deploy ancient sources to justify misogyny and a return of antifeminist masculinity. Donna Zuckerberg dives deep to take a look at this unexpected reanimation of the Classical tradition.

  • - The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism
    by Quinn Slobodian
    £0.00 - 17.49

    Do neoliberals hate the state? In the first intellectual history of neoliberal globalism, Quinn Slobodian follows neoliberal thinkers from the Habsburg Empire's fall to the creation of the World Trade Organization to show that neoliberalism emerged less to shrink government and abolish regulations than to deploy them globally to protect capitalism.

  • - The Men of the Harvard Grant Study
    by George E. Vaillant

    At a time when people are living into their tenth decade, the longest longitudinal study of human development ever undertaken offers welcome news for old age: our lives evolve in our later years and often become more fulfilling. Among the surprising findings: people who do well in old age did not necessarily do so well in midlife, and vice versa.

  • by Livy
    £18.38 - 22.49

    The only extant work by Livy (64 or 59 BCE -12 or 17 CE) is part of his history of Rome from the foundation of the city to 9 BCE. Of its 142 books 1-10, 21-45 (except parts of 41 and 43-45), fragments, and short summaries remain. Livy's history is a source for the De Prodigiis of Julius Obsequens (fourth century CE).

  • by Bruno Latour
    £24.99

    With the rise of science, we moderns believe, the world changed irrevocably, separating us forever from our primitive, premodern ancestors. But if we were to let go of this fond conviction, Bruno Latour asks, what would the world look like? His book, an anthropology of science, shows us how much of modernity is actually a matter of faith. What does it mean to be modern? What difference does the scientific method make? The difference, Latour explains, is in our careful distinctions between nature and society, between human and thing, distinctions that our benighted ancestors, in their world of alchemy, astrology, and phrenology, never made. But alongside this purifying practice that defines modernity, there exists another seemingly contrary one: the construction of systems that mix politics, science, technology, and nature. The ozone debate is such a hybrid, in Latour's analysis, as are global warming, deforestation, even the idea of black holes. As these hybrids proliferate, the prospect of keeping nature and culture in their separate mental chambers becomes overwhelming-and rather than try, Latour suggests, we should rethink our distinctions, rethink the definition and constitution of modernity itself. His book offers a new explanation of science that finally recognizes the connections between nature and culture-and so, between our culture and others, past and present. Nothing short of a reworking of our mental landscape. We Have Never Been Modern blurs the boundaries among science, the humanities, and the social sciences to enhance understanding on all sides. A summation of the work of one of the most influential and provocative interpreters of science, it aims at saving what is good and valuable in modernity and replacing the rest with a broader, fairer, and finer sense of possibility.

  • - Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI
    by Frank Pasquale
    £22.49

    Artificial intelligence threatens to disrupt the professions as it has manufacturing. Frank Pasquale argues that law and policy can avert this outcome and promote better ones: instead of replacing humans, technology can make our labor more valuable. Through regulation, we can ensure that AI promotes inclusive prosperity.

  • by Cicero
    £20.99

    We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic.

  • by Cicero
    £20.49

    We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic.

  • by Cicero
    £20.49

    We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic.

  • by Cicero
    £20.49

    We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic.

  • - Psychological Theory and Women's Development
    by Carol Gilligan
    £19.99

    In a Different Voice is the little book that started a revolution, making women's voices heard, in their own right and with their own integrity, for virtually the first time in social scientific theorizing about women. Its impact was immediate and continues to this day, in the academic world and beyond.

  • - Zany, Cute, Interesting
    by Sianne Ngai

    The zany, the cute, and the interesting saturate postmodern culture, dominating the look of its art and commodities as well as our ways of speaking about the ambivalent feelings these objects often inspire. In this study Ngai offers an aesthetic theory for the hypercommodified, mass-mediated, performance-driven world of late capitalism.

  • by Ezra F. Vogel
    £22.99

    No one in the twentieth century had a greater impact on world history than Deng Xiaoping. And no scholar is better qualified than Ezra Vogel to disentangle the contradictions embodied in the life and legacy of China's boldest strategist-the pragmatic, disciplined force behind China's radical economic, technological, and social transformation.

  • by Rainer Maria Rilke
    £13.49

    These ten letters by Rainer Maria Rilke speak directly to the young, offering unguarded thoughts on such diverse subjects as creativity, solitude, self-reliance, living with uncertainty, the shallowness of irony, the uselessness of criticism, career choices, sex, love, God, and art (which is only another way of living, Rilke writes).

  • by Harriet J. Smith
    £29.99

    In a narrative rich with vivid anecdotes derived from interviews with primatologists, from her own experience breeding cottontop tamarin monkeys for over 30 years, and from her clinical psychology practice, Smith describes the ways that primates care for their offspring, from infancy through young adulthood.

  • by Edward O. Wilson
    £23.49

    Biophilia is Edward O. Wilson's most personal book, an evocation of his own response to nature and an eloquent statement of the conservation ethic. Wilson argues that our natural affinity for life-biophilia-is the very essence of our humanity and binds us to all other living things.

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